Arena (1975)

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Arena is a British television documentary series, made and broadcast by the BBC. It has run since 1 October 1975, and over five hundred episodes have been made. Arena covers all manner of subjects, from profiles of notable people such as Bob Dylan to the Ford Cortina car. Arena was originally conceived by the producer Alan Yentob, who also did on-camera presenting and interviewing work for the programme. Arena was voted one of the 50 most influential programmes of all time in a poll of leading TV executives in Broadcast magazine.

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Episode Description

1

A Short Film About Bottles

Mini-documentary telling the story behind the iconic Arena title sequence.
Episode Description

5

Honky Tonk Blues

6

Tomorrow Never Knows

7

The Sun Will Shine Tomorrow

12

A Short History of Mel Brooks

13

Heavy Metal

Episode Description

4

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Episode Description

1

Theatre

Premiere. Ronald Eyre reviews what's going on in the theatre, Kenneth Tynan talks to Laurence Olivier about Lilian Baylis and The Old Vic, and a film about David Hockney's sets for The Rake's Progress.

2

Art and Design

George Melly looks at how they sold the 70's and a report on the opening of the Space Studios.

3

Theatre (2)

An interview with Howard Barker, author of 'Stripwell', and an extract from same; commentary by Kenneth Tynan; and an investigation of 'Birds of Paradise'.

3

Theatre (2)

An interview with Howard Barker, author of 'Stripwell', and an extract from same; commentary by Kenneth Tynan; and an investigation of 'Birds of Paradise'.

4

Art and Design (2)

Cartoonist Mel Caiman on the New Yorker magazine and its artists, Richard Hamilton at the Serpentine Gallery, and a new documentary exhibition from Jarrow.

4

Art and Design (2)

Cartoonist Mel Caiman on the New Yorker magazine and its artists, Richard Hamilton at the Serpentine Gallery, and a new documentary exhibition from Jarrow.

5

Theatre (3)

Peter Hall talks about the history and new South Band location of the National Theater, where he is artistic director.

6

Art and Design (3)

Features Observer critic William Feaver on Painting the End of the World, Bill Brandt's selection of landscape photography at the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the best of science fiction illustration.

6

Art and Design (3)

Features Observer critic William Feaver on Painting the End of the World, Bill Brandt's selection of landscape photography at the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the best of science fiction illustration.

7

Theatre (4)

Extract from a contemporary play and Kenneth Tynan opines.

8

Art and Design (4)

Shirley Conran is the guest columnist; fashion photographer Barry Lategan is filmed working; and Victorian painter Edward Burne-Jones' London exhibition.

8

Art and Design (4)

Shirley Conran is the guest columnist; fashion photographer Barry Lategan is filmed working; and Victorian painter Edward Burne-Jones' London exhibition.

9

Theatre (5)

Deborah Norton reviews British stage events, a play extract, and Kenneth Tynan opines about the theatre.

10

Art and Design (5)

Guest columnist Terry Measham; a look into the work of painter and poet Charles Tomlinson.

11

Theatre (6)

Mikhail Baryshnikov and Natalia Makarova rehearse for a BBC New Year Gala Performance; Kenneth Tynan draws a portrait of Albert Finney.

11

Theatre (6)

Mikhail Baryshnikov and Natalia Makarova rehearse for a BBC New Year Gala Performance; Kenneth Tynan draws a portrait of Albert Finney.

12

Art and Design (6)

Filmmaker Roger Graef and journalist Simon Jenkins discuss the destruction of historical buildings, in light of a recent SAVE campaign report and the conclusion of the European Architectural Heritage Year.

12

Art and Design (6)

Filmmaker Roger Graef and journalist Simon Jenkins discuss the destruction of historical buildings, in light of a recent SAVE campaign report and the conclusion of the European Architectural Heritage Year.
Episode Description

1

Theatre (7)

Deborah Norton returns with reports, interviews and extracts from what is liveliest and best in the British theatrical scene.

2

Art and Design (7)

3

Theatre (8)

Jonathan Miller introduces this week's look at what is most stimulating and enjoyable on the theatrical scene.

3

Theatre (8)

Jonathan Miller introduces this week's look at what is most stimulating and enjoyable on the theatrical scene.

4

Art and Design (8)

A look at American photographer Paul Strand and recent trends in British photography.

5

Theatre (9)

Arena goes to Scarborough for the British premiere of a new Alan Ayckbourn play "Just Between Ourselves".

6

Art and Design (9)

Arena looks at aspects of community art and the work of painter Keith Grant, artist-in-residence at the New Charing Cross Hospital.

6

Art and Design (9)

Arena looks at aspects of community art and the work of painter Keith Grant, artist-in-residence at the New Charing Cross Hospital.

7

Theatre (10)

Claire Bloom and Kenneth Tynan discuss extracts from Samuel Beckett's 'Happy Days', George Bernard Shaw's 'Too True to be Good', and Tennessee Williams' 'Sweet Bird of Youth'.

7

Theatre (10)

Claire Bloom and Kenneth Tynan discuss extracts from Samuel Beckett's 'Happy Days', George Bernard Shaw's 'Too True to be Good', and Tennessee Williams' 'Sweet Bird of Youth'.

8

Art and Design (10)

Arena talks with Robert Janz and Dante Leonelli about incorporating time into sculpture.

8

Art and Design (10)

Arena talks with Robert Janz and Dante Leonelli about incorporating time into sculpture.

9

Theatre (11)

Arena brings extracts from Paris' contemporary theatre season, including Frank Wedekind's 'Lulu' and Marguerite Duras' 'Days in the Tree', and an interview with Delphine Seyrig.

9

Theatre (11)

Arena brings extracts from Paris' contemporary theatre season, including Frank Wedekind's 'Lulu' and Marguerite Duras' 'Days in the Tree', and an interview with Delphine Seyrig.

10

Art and Design (11)

Art and Design

11

Theatre (12)

Barbara Jefford, Laurence Olivier, Joan Plowright, Kenneth Tynan Billie Whitelaw and many of the people behind the scenes say goodbye to the Old Vic building.

11

Theatre (12)

Barbara Jefford, Laurence Olivier, Joan Plowright, Kenneth Tynan Billie Whitelaw and many of the people behind the scenes say goodbye to the Old Vic building.

12

Art and Design (12)

Liverpool poet and painter Adrian Henry visits 'The Face of Merseyside'; Boyd and Evans use photographs as the basis of their explorations of everyday life.

13

Theatre: Happy Birthday Royal Court

Alumni of the Royal Court celebrate its 20th anniversary.

13

Theatre: Happy Birthday Royal Court

Alumni of the Royal Court celebrate its 20th anniversary.

14

Art and Design: Art for Money's Sake?

Barrie Penrose investigates a multi-national art empire and the artists and methods that created it.

14

Art and Design: Art for Money's Sake?

Barrie Penrose investigates a multi-national art empire and the artists and methods that created it.

15

Edinburgh International Festival 1976: Part 1

Features Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Galina Visnevskaya in the Scottish Opera's production of Macbeth, The Kantor Theatre Company from Poland, and Fenella Fielding in a late-night revue.

15

Edinburgh International Festival 1976: Part 1

Features Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Galina Visnevskaya in the Scottish Opera's production of Macbeth, The Kantor Theatre Company from Poland, and Fenella Fielding in a late-night revue.

16

Edinburgh International Festival 1976: Part 2

Features the La Mama Theatre Company from New York; Bunraku, traditional Japanese Puppet Theatre; a recital by Frederica Von Stade; and Judith Blegen as Susanna in 'The Marriage of Figaro'.

16

Edinburgh International Festival 1976: Part 2

Features the La Mama Theatre Company from New York; Bunraku, traditional Japanese Puppet Theatre; a recital by Frederica Von Stade; and Judith Blegen as Susanna in 'The Marriage of Figaro'.

17

Edinburgh International Festival 1976: Part 3

Writer Germaine Greer and her god-daughter Ruby take a look at a child's Edinburgh Festival and some of the fringe activities, including Gruppo Teatro Libero from Rome and Quentin Crisp.

17

Edinburgh International Festival 1976: Part 3

Writer Germaine Greer and her god-daughter Ruby take a look at a child's Edinburgh Festival and some of the fringe activities, including Gruppo Teatro Libero from Rome and Quentin Crisp.

18

Theatre: A Dream Come True

A look at the opening of the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester.

18

Theatre: A Dream Come True

A look at the opening of the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester.

19

Cinema (1)

Gavin Miller interviews the director Robert Altman on "M*A*S*H", "Nashville", "Buffalo Bill and the Indians" and more.

19

Cinema (1)

Gavin Miller interviews the director Robert Altman on "M*A*S*H", "Nashville", "Buffalo Bill and the Indians" and more.

20

Art and Design: After Samuel Palmer

David Gould, the expert who discovered Tom Keating's Samuel Palmer imitations, shows the process of identifying and analyzing suspected pictures.

21

Cinema (2)

Gavin Millar talks with Frank Westmore, whose family has dominated the make-up departments of American cinema for decades.

22

Theatre (15)

Peter Shaffer, writer of 'Equus', talks about his plays, his life and the theatre with an excerpt from the 1976 stage production of 'Equus'.

23

Cinema: Eric Rohmer

Gavin Millar interviews director Eric Rohmer about 'Die Marquise von O', 'Claire's Knee' and 'Love in the Afternoon'.

24

Art and Design: The Illustrators: The Work of Mick Brownfield and Allan Manham/The Swish of the Curtain

British illustrators Mick Brownfield and Allan Manham are documented working on their current projects; Artist Chris Orr probes the dreadful truth behind the net curtains of suburbia.

24

Art and Design: The Illustrators: The Work of Mick Brownfield and Allan Manham/The Swish of the Curtain

British illustrators Mick Brownfield and Allan Manham are documented working on their current projects; Artist Chris Orr probes the dreadful truth behind the net curtains of suburbia.

25

Cinema: Don Siegel

Don Siegel, director of 'The Shootist', 'Charley Varrick', 'Coogan's Bluff', 'Dirty Harry' and many other violent thrillers talks about the problems of the director who is typecast by his success in one specialized genre.

25

Cinema: Don Siegel

Don Siegel, director of 'The Shootist', 'Charley Varrick', 'Coogan's Bluff', 'Dirty Harry' and many other violent thrillers talks about the problems of the director who is typecast by his success in one specialized genre.

26

Theatre: The Cultural Common Market

A look at Theatre National Populaire, one of France's leading theaters, and Patrice Chéreau's 'La Dispute' by Marivaux and Roger Planchon's 'Tartuffe', as well as scene's from Planchon's scenes from his Blues, Whites and Reds.

26

Theatre: The Cultural Common Market

A look at Theatre National Populaire, one of France's leading theaters, and Patrice Chéreau's 'La Dispute' by Marivaux and Roger Planchon's 'Tartuffe', as well as scene's from Planchon's scenes from his Blues, Whites and Reds.

27

Cinema: British Films

In light of the low proportion of British films in the 20th London Film Festival, Gavin Millar looks at what's wrong with the British film industry and distribution system.

28

Art and Design: Sculpture for the Blind/Linda Benedict-Jones/James Boswell

Sculpture for the Blind - a special Tate Gallery exhibition; Linda Benedict-Jones, photographer; James Boswell - a revival of his war pictures.

29

Cinema: 'The Long Vacation of 36'

Arena speaks with Spanish directors at the Madrid premiere of 'The Long Vacation of 36'.

30

Theatre: Brecht in Newcastle

20th anniversary tribute to Bertolt Brecht at Newcastle's University Theatre with scenes from 'The Good Woman of Setzuan' and prose, poetry and music.

31

Cinema: Christmas Special

A look at the Disney exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum; an interview with 'The Ritz' director Dick Lester and actress Rita Moreno; an excerpt from Buster Keaton's 'Spite Marriage'; and the results of the Titles Competition.

31

Cinema: Christmas Special

A look at the Disney exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum; an interview with 'The Ritz' director Dick Lester and actress Rita Moreno; an excerpt from Buster Keaton's 'Spite Marriage'; and the results of the Titles Competition.
Episode Description

1

Cinema: Mel Brooks

Gavin Millar talks to Mel Brooks just before the London release of 'Silent Movie'.

2

Art and Design: Sam Smith: Genuine England/Arena Review

An introduction to the magical world of wood-sculptor Sam Smith, plus a look at one of this month's major exhibitions.

2

Art and Design: Sam Smith: Genuine England/Arena Review

An introduction to the magical world of wood-sculptor Sam Smith, plus a look at one of this month's major exhibitions.

3

Cinema: 'The Front'

Gavin Miller talks to director Martin Ritt, writer Walter Bernstein, and actors Woody Allen and Zero Mostel about 'The Front'

3

Cinema: 'The Front'

Gavin Miller talks to director Martin Ritt, writer Walter Bernstein, and actors Woody Allen and Zero Mostel about 'The Front'

4

Theatre: Spokesong/At Home with Mole

An interview with Stewart Parker about his new musical 'Spokesong' with excerpt; a profile of 81 year old actor Richard Goolden with scenes from 'Toad of Toad Hall' and Tom Stoppard's 'Dirty Linen and New-Found-Land'.

4

Theatre: Spokesong/At Home with Mole

An interview with Stewart Parker about his new musical 'Spokesong' with excerpt; a profile of 81 year old actor Richard Goolden with scenes from 'Toad of Toad Hall' and Tom Stoppard's 'Dirty Linen and New-Found-Land'.

5

Cinema: News

A fortnightly look at the big screen at home and abroad. News, views and interviews presented by Gavin Millar.

6

Art and Design: Ralph Steadman

Ralph Steadman illustrates a children's anti-war story, caricatures at his local pub, and speaks about his drawing techniques and his work, including Alice, and impressions of the Patty Hearst trial and the Watergate hearings.

7

Cinema: 'Network'

Gavin Miller discusses 'Network' with director Sidney Lumet and Robert Kee; Alberto Cavalcanti talks about his film career on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

7

Cinema: 'Network'

Gavin Miller discusses 'Network' with director Sidney Lumet and Robert Kee; Alberto Cavalcanti talks about his film career on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

8

Theatre: The Cultural Common Market: Peter Stein and the Schaubuhne

Peter Stein, director of Die Schaubuhne theatre co-operative, comes to London with his Shakespeare Project. Includes extracts from 'Summerfolk' and 'Shakespeare's Memory'.

8

Theatre: The Cultural Common Market: Peter Stein and the Schaubuhne

Peter Stein, director of Die Schaubuhne theatre co-operative, comes to London with his Shakespeare Project. Includes extracts from 'Summerfolk' and 'Shakespeare's Memory'.

9

Cinema: 'Z'

Gavin Millar talks to New Yorker critic Pauline Kael about Costa-Gavras' 'Z' and 'Section Speciale', along with her passion for the movies and how she wields her power.

10

Art and Design: What Is a Hologram?/Kit Williams - Ring Around the Moon

Arena investigates holograms and their potential in the arts; artist Kit Williams' vivid folklore paintings.

10

Art and Design: What Is a Hologram?/Kit Williams - Ring Around the Moon

Arena investigates holograms and their potential in the arts; artist Kit Williams' vivid folklore paintings.

11

Cinema: 'A Star is Born'

On the occasion of the release of the third film version of 'A Star is Born', James Mason talks about the curious business of stardom and how it has changed.

11

Cinema: 'A Star is Born'

On the occasion of the release of the third film version of 'A Star is Born', James Mason talks about the curious business of stardom and how it has changed.

12

Theatre: A Night Out

Arena visits three theatres - the Mercury Theater in Colchester, the Humberside Theatre in Hull, and the Duke's Playhouse in Lancaster - to find out what they are doing, how they are doing it and why they think they should go on doing it.

13

Cinema: Ealing Studios

A look at Ealing Studios, including excerpts of many of their popular films.

14

Art and Design: Family Pieces/Both Sides of the Line/The Divine and the Fantastic

Portrait painter Philip Sutton; Helmut Weissenborn, a German WWI soldier who illustrated with wood engravings the war diary of Edward Thomas, an English poet who died in WWI; and Gothic art in Cologne.

14

Art and Design: Family Pieces/Both Sides of the Line/The Divine and the Fantastic

Portrait painter Philip Sutton; Helmut Weissenborn, a German WWI soldier who illustrated with wood engravings the war diary of Edward Thomas, an English poet who died in WWI; and Gothic art in Cologne.

15

Cinema: Bernardo Bertolucci

In a special edition from Rome, Gavin Millar interviews Bernardo Bertolucci, director of 'Last Tango in Paris' and '1900', and Gore Vidal on Hollywood and 'Cinecitta'.

15

Cinema: Bernardo Bertolucci

In a special edition from Rome, Gavin Millar interviews Bernardo Bertolucci, director of 'Last Tango in Paris' and '1900', and Gore Vidal on Hollywood and 'Cinecitta'.

16

Theatre: The Prospect Before Us

Prospect Theatre Company reopens the Old Vic. Includes rehearsal footage from 'St Joan', 'Hamlet', 'Antony and Cleopatra', and 'War Music', a new musical adaptation of 'The Iliad' by Christopher Logue.

16

Theatre: The Prospect Before Us

Prospect Theatre Company reopens the Old Vic. Includes rehearsal footage from 'St Joan', 'Hamlet', 'Antony and Cleopatra', and 'War Music', a new musical adaptation of 'The Iliad' by Christopher Logue.

17

Cinema: Bernardo Bertolucci (2)

Gavin Millar talks to director Bernardo Berolucci in Rome about '1900', his new five and a half hour film, as well as his earlier work.

17

Cinema: Bernardo Bertolucci (2)

Gavin Millar talks to director Bernardo Berolucci in Rome about '1900', his new five and a half hour film, as well as his earlier work.

18

Art and Design: The Continuous Diary/Dine's Drawings

The artist Ian Breakwall gave up painting for the art of a daily diary; Jim Dine explains why he returned from pop art to drawing the human figure.

18

Art and Design: The Continuous Diary/Dine's Drawings

The artist Ian Breakwall gave up painting for the art of a daily diary; Jim Dine explains why he returned from pop art to drawing the human figure.

19

Cinema: Erotic Films

Arena looks at erotic films, including 'Je T'Aime Moi Non Plus', 'Hardcore', and 'Come Play With Me'.

20

Cinema: Sophia Loren

An interview with Sophia Loren on the occasion of the opening of 'The Cassandra Crossing'.

20

Cinema: Sophia Loren

An interview with Sophia Loren on the occasion of the opening of 'The Cassandra Crossing'.

21

Edinburgh Festival

Features the 1977 Edinburgh International Festival with a new production of Carmen, the experimental shows, Film Festival, Television Festival, and art galleries.

22

Cinema: John Frankenheimer

Gavin Millar returns for a new season after a visit to Hollywood, which despite rumours of slump and panic is still the unquestioned capital of the cinema world. We talked to one of its ruling princes, John Frankenheimer, director of The Manchurian Candidate and Grand Prix, about his career in the Dream Factory, and especially his latest suspense thriller Black Sunday.

22

Cinema: John Frankenheimer

Gavin Millar returns for a new season after a visit to Hollywood, which despite rumours of slump and panic is still the unquestioned capital of the cinema world. We talked to one of its ruling princes, John Frankenheimer, director of The Manchurian Candidate and Grand Prix, about his career in the Dream Factory, and especially his latest suspense thriller Black Sunday.

23

Cinema: New York, New York

Martin Scorsese 's film New York, New York starring Robert De Niro and Liza Minnelli is his most ambitious film to date. Not just a nostalgic homage to the Hollywood musical but a personal work that means as much to him, says Scorsese as Mean Streets and Taxi Driver. Gavin Millar talks to Scorsese in San Francisco and the programme includes rare interviews with Robert De Nira , Liza Minnelli and Jodie Foster.

23

Cinema: New York, New York

Martin Scorsese 's film New York, New York starring Robert De Niro and Liza Minnelli is his most ambitious film to date. Not just a nostalgic homage to the Hollywood musical but a personal work that means as much to him, says Scorsese as Mean Streets and Taxi Driver. Gavin Millar talks to Scorsese in San Francisco and the programme includes rare interviews with Robert De Nira , Liza Minnelli and Jodie Foster.

24

Art and Design: Achtung Minen ! The work of Ian Hamilton Finlay

William Feaver introduces the latest work of this unique and controversial artist, known since the 60s as our foremost concrete poet. We visit Finláy's remote home in Scotland, where he has constructed his garden as a poem, a submarine noses its way through the bushes, an aircraft-carrier functions as a bird bath, and the sign on his front lawn tells us to beware of mines - Achtung Minen ! Plus Cleveland Brown a truly original naive painter from North London whose subjects include the Spaghetti House Siege and the Queen's Jubilee.

24

Art and Design: Achtung Minen ! The work of Ian Hamilton Finlay

William Feaver introduces the latest work of this unique and controversial artist, known since the 60s as our foremost concrete poet. We visit Finláy's remote home in Scotland, where he has constructed his garden as a poem, a submarine noses its way through the bushes, an aircraft-carrier functions as a bird bath, and the sign on his front lawn tells us to beware of mines - Achtung Minen ! Plus Cleveland Brown a truly original naive painter from North London whose subjects include the Spaghetti House Siege and the Queen's Jubilee.

25

Cinema: 'Annie Hall'

Diane Keaton and Woody Allen talk about the filming of 'Annie Hall' and their long friendship.

26

Theatre: Noel Coward in The Gorbals

Second only to North Sea oil, the Glasgow Citizens' Theatre is Scotland's most staggering and unlikely success story. Despite its location on a devastated patch of Gorbals' ground, it attracts a large and dedicated audience for its bold and often spectacular productions. A look at the company, its policy, its audience and its plays.

26

Theatre: Noel Coward in The Gorbals

Second only to North Sea oil, the Glasgow Citizens' Theatre is Scotland's most staggering and unlikely success story. Despite its location on a devastated patch of Gorbals' ground, it attracts a large and dedicated audience for its bold and often spectacular productions. A look at the company, its policy, its audience and its plays.

27

Cinema: Greece

The Colonels have gone - and Greek cinema is emerging again. Gavin Millar talks to Melina Mercouri in Athens where she is finishing her first film since her return from exile.

28

Art and Design: Richard Seifert

This month features Richard Seifert , who created much of the new sky-line of London. His high-rise blocks - most notably Centre Point - have been the cause of controversy and scandal, while the architect himself has remained an elusive and enigmatic figure. Now he talks to Arena about his career, his personal reason for city planning, and his present attitude to high-rise building. Plus Cleveland Brown : the work of a truly original North London ' naive ' painter - postponed from last month. And another discovery: an exhibition of dazzling patchwork pictures made by the wives of political prisoners in Chile.

28

Art and Design: Richard Seifert

This month features Richard Seifert , who created much of the new sky-line of London. His high-rise blocks - most notably Centre Point - have been the cause of controversy and scandal, while the architect himself has remained an elusive and enigmatic figure. Now he talks to Arena about his career, his personal reason for city planning, and his present attitude to high-rise building. Plus Cleveland Brown : the work of a truly original North London ' naive ' painter - postponed from last month. And another discovery: an exhibition of dazzling patchwork pictures made by the wives of political prisoners in Chile.

29

Cinema

A fortnightly look at the big screen at home and abroad: news, views and interviews presented by Gavin Millar

30

Theatre: Hands Off the Classics

Messing around with the classics has a long and honoured history. In the 17th century Troilus and Cressida was produced with all the dirty bits cut out. In the 18th, King Lear had a happy ending. In the 19th, vast chunks were sliced off the classics to make way for ballet and vaudeville. In our own century we take a scalpel to the classic rather than a hatchet. Nevertheless a fascinating and vitriolic debate is now raging over the border line between interpretation and vandalism.

30

Theatre: Hands Off the Classics

Messing around with the classics has a long and honoured history. In the 17th century Troilus and Cressida was produced with all the dirty bits cut out. In the 18th, King Lear had a happy ending. In the 19th, vast chunks were sliced off the classics to make way for ballet and vaudeville. In our own century we take a scalpel to the classic rather than a hatchet. Nevertheless a fascinating and vitriolic debate is now raging over the border line between interpretation and vandalism.

31

Cinema: 21st London Film Festival

Introduced by Gavin Millar This week sees the opening of the 21st London Film Festival -the festival of festivals - with new films from 24 countries. Bertolucci, Angelopoulos, Herzog, James Ivory , Marguerite Duras and most of the brightest names in cinema will be here to see their films screened. Arena: Cinema reports on this year's highlights.

32

Art and Design: The Family/Wrapping up the Reichstag

The Family: Michael Bennett introduces Uncle Cyril and other members of his own family whom he has immortalised in an exhibition of photographs. Wrapping up the Reichstag: The artist Christo has parcelled up buildings, coastlines, and human beings, hung an orange curtain across a Colorado gulf and created a two-million-dollar nylon fence along 25 miles of American farm-land. Last week CHRISTO was in London, and he explained to Arena his latest project- wrapping up the Reichstag in Berlin. The Wireless Show

33

Cinema: 21st London Film Festival (2)

This year's London Film Festival -the 21st - has been one of the biggest ever with a wider spread of films - in scale, nationality, genre and politics - than ever before. But one of the constant themes in pictures big and small has been the political struggle of Left and Right: fascism still seems everybody's favourite subject. Featuring Bertolucci's 1900, and films by Larissa Shepitko , Syberberg, Tanner and Gutierrez.

34

Theatre: Leonard Rossiter

Leonard Rossiter is currently tackling his most demanding role as The Immortal Haydon. Alone on stage for two hours, he portrays the mad 18th-century painter Benjamin Haydon , whose life of wild fantasy and ambition ended in suicide. Nola Rae is a mime artist, clown, and one of the funniest women on the stage. She re-creates for Arena some of her bizarre and poignant characters, and Michael Dean makes a valiant attempt to interview her.

35

Cinema: The Deep

The Deep opens in London this week. Written by the man who wrote Jaws, Peter Benchley , it's been the biggest grosser in the USA this year-after Star Wars, of course. Although it features an underwater Jacqueline Bisset menaced by a moray eel, it has nothing to do with Jaws, swears its British director PETER YATES. Yates has been one of our more successful exports since Steve McQueen asked him over to direct Bullitt.
Episode Description

1

Cinema: The Force is with us?

Star Wars - the biggest and fastest money-maker in the history of the movies - has opened in Britain at last. What on earth - or in heaven - has caused the phenomenal success of this galactic romp-cum-morality tale?Gavin Millar talks to the producer Gary Kurtz , the designer John Barry and to Mark Hamill who plays the young hero Luke Sky-walker Production team.

2

'The Journey' or The Memoirs of a Self-Confessed Surrealist

George Melly makes an unusual journey to the 1978 Surrealist Exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, London.

3

Cinema: The Force is with us? (2) / Howard Hawks

Star Wars - the biggest and fastest money-maker in the history of the movies - has opened in Britain at last. What on earth - or in heaven -has caused the phenomenal success of this galactic romp-cum-morality tale? Gavin Millar talks to the producer Gary Kurtz , the designer John Barry and to Mark Hamill who plays the young hero Luke. Howard Hawks died this Christmas. His career spanned the history of Hollywood. As well as designing and racing sports cars, motor-bikes and aeroplanes he wrote, directed and produced every kind of Hollywood movie. The Big Sleep, Red River, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Bringing up Baby are amongst the best examples of their genre. GAVIN MILLAR talked to him at his home in Palm Springs just before his 80th birthday.

3

Cinema: The Force is with us? (2) / Howard Hawks

Star Wars - the biggest and fastest money-maker in the history of the movies - has opened in Britain at last. What on earth - or in heaven -has caused the phenomenal success of this galactic romp-cum-morality tale? Gavin Millar talks to the producer Gary Kurtz , the designer John Barry and to Mark Hamill who plays the young hero Luke. Howard Hawks died this Christmas. His career spanned the history of Hollywood. As well as designing and racing sports cars, motor-bikes and aeroplanes he wrote, directed and produced every kind of Hollywood movie. The Big Sleep, Red River, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Bringing up Baby are amongst the best examples of their genre. GAVIN MILLAR talked to him at his home in Palm Springs just before his 80th birthday.

4

Theatre: ' But please, this is a farce! ' The story of The Cherry Orchard

5

Cinema: Joseph Conrad

A British film The Duellists starring Keith Carradine , Harvey Keitel and Albert Finney won the Special Jury Award at Cannes last year and it opened in London last week. It is a finely photographed period film set in the beautiful Dordogne but the most admirable thing about it may be that it is as faithful an adaptation of Conrad as any the screen has seen - and there have been many, from a 1926 silent version of Nostromo to Richard Brooks 's Lord Jim and Hitchcock's Sabotage.

6

Art and Design: Carrington

Carrington: the letters and paintings of a gifted and tragic artist. ' She was alive at every point, and the variety of her feelings wore her out. All her life she remained a giver, not a receiver.'

7

Cinema: Claude Renoir

The man who in 1936 shot Jean Renoir 's Partie de Campagne, the lyrical masterpiece of petit-bourgeois life in the 90s, nowadays finds himself tackling the somewhat different territory of James Bond. Arena: Cinema talks to CLAUDE RENOIR about all sides of his long, fascinating career as a top feature film cameraman.

8

Theatre: Hey Kids! Let's Do the Show Right Here ...

This month Arena Theatre looks at the hard facts and the familiar cliches behind a new British Musical revival. A bitter-sweet story - with song and dance-as told by ex-' trouper ' Glyn Worsnip. With sneak previews from The Travelling Music Show Kings and Clowns Kismet, and featuring Bruce Forsyth, Lionel Bart , Anthony Newley Lesley Bricusse , Frank Finlay, Tim Rice , Andrew Lloyd Webber.

9

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

No television cameras were allowed onto the set of CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND, but ARENA: CINEMA was present on the last day of shooting to watch Spielberg at work and talk to him about the film.

10

Art and Design: Carl Andre

The Man Behind the Bricks, a film about the controversial American artist, whose brick ' sculpture' caused a storm of protest when first exhibited at the Tate Gallery two years ago. Prior to a major one-man show at the Whitechapel Gallery, Arena meets him in London and New York. Madame Stravinsky Actress, designer and now a painter - VERA STRAVINSKY , widow of the great Russian composer, talks to RONALD HARWOOD about her remarkable life.

10

Art and Design: Carl Andre

The Man Behind the Bricks, a film about the controversial American artist, whose brick ' sculpture' caused a storm of protest when first exhibited at the Tate Gallery two years ago. Prior to a major one-man show at the Whitechapel Gallery, Arena meets him in London and New York. Madame Stravinsky Actress, designer and now a painter - VERA STRAVINSKY , widow of the great Russian composer, talks to RONALD HARWOOD about her remarkable life.

11

Cinema: Dancing Years

Shirley MacLaine starring with Mikhail Baryshnikov makes a powerful return to the screen in The Turning Point as an ex-dancer. In Monte Carlo at the World Premiere, she talks about her life on screen and off. Plus Roseland - James Ivory 's new film follows the fortunes of the lonely at New York's famous old-time dance hall.

12

Theatre: Taking Our Time

Taking Our Time For the last ten years The Red Ladder Company have played in pubs, clubs and community halls, mostly to audiences who have never set foot inside a theatre. Taking Our Time is their latest play. Set in 1842, it uses drama, comedy and songs to tell the story of a turning-point in British history - when the hand-loom weavers of the North rose up against the newly-mechanised world of the Industrial Revolution. Filmed among the industrial museums and the weaving and wool-combing factories of West Yorkshire, this programme shows the making and performance of a new work by one of Britain's most adventurous theatre companies.

13

Art and Design: Way Out West

Patrick Hughes runs a home for retired rainbows in the port of St Ives. It's the latest project in a lifetime's work spent exploring visual puns, paradoxes and jokes. Cominq Up for Air John Abbott left the Royal College of Art and a hectic life in London six years ago. He now lives on his own in a remote and beautiful Dartmoor cottage but his work is still haunted by disturbing images of city life.

14

Theatre: Children of the Gods

Arena goes to Amsterdam to film the spectacular Japanese theatre company, Tenjosajiki, prior to their first visit to England. Renowned for their fantasy plays based on ceremonial and literary themes, the astonishing virtuosity and imaginative range of this company have earned them both fame and notoriety throughout the world. Their latest production Directions to Servants is typical of their work - a combination of daring visual style and rigorous discipline which makes them unique.

15

Television: When Is A Play Not A Play?

Examines the current controversy over the blurring of boundaries between drama and documentary. Looks at the conventions programme makers use who make drama documentaries and faction programmes.

16

Art and Design: George Melly

Another chance to see George Melly 's highly-personal view of two of the most popular recent events in the art world. A Beginner's Guide to Holograms A magical introduction to this futuristic phenomenon - an entree into a world of art and illusion. The Journey: On a nostalgic trip through front rooms and back streets, GEORGE MELLY revives the spirit of Dada and surrealism, one of the most important movements of 20th-century art.

16

Art and Design: George Melly

Another chance to see George Melly 's highly-personal view of two of the most popular recent events in the art world. A Beginner's Guide to Holograms A magical introduction to this futuristic phenomenon - an entree into a world of art and illusion. The Journey: On a nostalgic trip through front rooms and back streets, GEORGE MELLY revives the spirit of Dada and surrealism, one of the most important movements of 20th-century art.

17

Theatre: Arnold Wesker

This week Arena reassesses the major achievement of an established dramatist, and looks forward to the work of an exciting new one. John Byrne is a Scottish writer with a highly-original comic talent. Arena visits him in Scotland and enters the world of The Slab Boys -his latest play set in a carpet factory in Glasgow and based on his own experiences. Arnold Wesker 's celebrated Roots trilogy is being revived at the Shaw Theatre, London. It provides a unique chance to reassess a work many regard as an undoubted modern classic. WESKER talks about the trilogy and about his life and work in the 20 years since its first performance.

18

Rock:Tubes on Tour

A special edition of ARENA: ROCK featuring rock group The Tubes.

19

Cinema: Francois Truffaut

Gavin Millar talked to Francois Truffaut when the film was first released here in 1970. From his first film, The Four Hundred Blows, which looks affectionately at the making of a young delinquent, to Small Change, made a couple of years ago, his films have often had children at their centre. In this first edition of a new series of Arena: Cinema Gavin Millar also talks to Bill Douglas whose recently completed trilogy about a poor Scottish childhood, My Childhood, My Ain Folk, My Way Home, is regarded by many as the most important contribution to the British cinema for years.

19

Cinema: Francois Truffaut

Gavin Millar talked to Francois Truffaut when the film was first released here in 1970. From his first film, The Four Hundred Blows, which looks affectionately at the making of a young delinquent, to Small Change, made a couple of years ago, his films have often had children at their centre. In this first edition of a new series of Arena: Cinema Gavin Millar also talks to Bill Douglas whose recently completed trilogy about a poor Scottish childhood, My Childhood, My Ain Folk, My Way Home, is regarded by many as the most important contribution to the British cinema for years.

20

Vanessa Redgrave

TV Documentary on the actress. It shows her in rehearsal, in performance, and talking about her commitment to an acting career.

21

Cinema: Hooray for Hollywood?

Gavin Millar talks to: Christopher Isherwood has been a Hollywood immigrant for 40 years and loved every minute of bis screenwriting career there. 'Thank goodness I had the sense to realise I wasn't the great genius prostituting myself.* Neil Simon (The' Goodbye Girl, The Cheap Detective) is a New York playwright who has chosen to live now in Hollywood. David Puttnam is the young English producer (Midnight Express) who has been in Hollywood only two years and is coming home. 'Leaving Los Angeles is Mke giving up heroin.'

21

Cinema: Hooray for Hollywood?

Gavin Millar talks to: Christopher Isherwood has been a Hollywood immigrant for 40 years and loved every minute of bis screenwriting career there. 'Thank goodness I had the sense to realise I wasn't the great genius prostituting myself.* Neil Simon (The' Goodbye Girl, The Cheap Detective) is a New York playwright who has chosen to live now in Hollywood. David Puttnam is the young English producer (Midnight Express) who has been in Hollywood only two years and is coming home. 'Leaving Los Angeles is Mke giving up heroin.'

22

Cinema: The Thirty-nine Steps

A new British film has its Royal Premiere tomorrow. It is an English period film and vividly demonstrates the high production values, quality and talent available in this country but which so rarely get the chance to reach our screens. The Thirty-nine Steps was originally a novel by John Buchan and has already been filmed twice, by HITCHCOCK in 1935, starring ROBERT DONAT , and by RALPH THOMAS in 1960, starring KENNETH MORE. Gavin Millar looks at the tradition from which it sprang. Plus a foretaste of one of the most interesting London Film Festivals ever.

23

Cinema: A report from Bombay

This year's London Film Festival contained five entries from India. It's a reminder that we hardly see any of the output of the biggest film industry in the world. Gavin Millar reports from Bombay, including interviews with Satyajtt Ray , Shyam Benegal and two of India's heart-throbs, Shashi Kapoor and Parveen Babi.

24

Cinema: Robert Altman

Robert Altman is one of the most accomplished film-makers in the world. His output has the kind of unexpected and original stamp that can provoke fury as much as idolatry. With M*A*S*H and Nashville, he has gathered around himself a regular production team and stable of actors. His new film is A Wedding which has attracted the usual crop of contradictory notices. It opens here on 28 December. Arena: Cinema presents an exclusive interview with ALTMAN plus news of Karel Reisz 's new film, the story of a Vietnam veteran, Dog Soldiers.
Episode Description

1

The Museum of Drawers

Arena takes you on a guided tour of the smallest museum in the world - its 'curator', Swiss artist Herbert Distel, has transformed a small chest-of-drawers into a miniature museum. Originally used to store cotton reels, the Museum of Drawers now houses a collection to rival any major gallery - 500 original works contributed by many of the world's leading artists.

2

On Photography

Featuring two of the greatest photographers of the 20th century Jacques Henri Lartigue began taking photographs at the age of seven in 1902. His celebrated Diary of a Century is a photographic record of his life from that time until the present day. This entrancing autobiography is a unique reflection of the passage of this century. 'Photography is a magic thing! Almost more enchanting and clear than the reality I was staring at.' Roman Vishniac a Russian Jew born in St Petersburg in 1897. His striking images of life in the Jewish ghettos-taken with a concealed camera just before the last world war-are extraordinary documents of a lost epoch, of a lost people. ' I returned again and again because I wanted to save their faces from the devastation of Hitler's Germany.'

3

Cinema

Gavin Millar presents another edition in his regular series about the cinema today.

4

Who Is Poly Styrene?

Film portrait of the New Wave singer-songwriter, Poly Styrene.

5

Athol Fugard: A Lesson from Aloes

Aloe: a genus of plant indigenous to South Africa, noted for its ability to survive under the most adverse conditions. Athol Fugard is the author of such celebrated plays as The Blood Knot, The Island, and Sizwe Bansi is Dead. He is known throughout the world for his opposition to Apartheid, and, more importantly, for his determination to express these views through the theatre and within South Africa. Last month his latest play, A Lesson from Aloes, opened in Johannesburg. It was both written and directed by Fugard and Arena was there from the first day of rehearsals until the opening night. The film offers a unique insight into the evolution of a play and the remarkable tenacity of its author.

5

Athol Fugard: A Lesson from Aloes

Aloe: a genus of plant indigenous to South Africa, noted for its ability to survive under the most adverse conditions. Athol Fugard is the author of such celebrated plays as The Blood Knot, The Island, and Sizwe Bansi is Dead. He is known throughout the world for his opposition to Apartheid, and, more importantly, for his determination to express these views through the theatre and within South Africa. Last month his latest play, A Lesson from Aloes, opened in Johannesburg. It was both written and directed by Fugard and Arena was there from the first day of rehearsals until the opening night. The film offers a unique insight into the evolution of a play and the remarkable tenacity of its author.

6

Cinema: John Carpenter and star Donald Pleasence

Assault on Precinct 13 and Dark Star were two of the ' sleepers ' of the last two years - small-budget films from the USA that struck a chord right round the world. Their young writer/director John Car penter's third feature film Hal loween has opened in London. Gavin Millar interviews John Carpenter and star Donald Pleasence on location in Los Angeles.

7

Maler's Requiem

Fibreglass carcasses, a flaming typewriter, and a troop of girl guides - each has been a -key ingredient in a work of art by Leopoldo Maler. Deliberately provocative, surprise and spectacle are key elements in Maler's work. Words and Images How do the verbal images of poetry relate to the visual images of painting? Charles Tomlinson , one of England's finest poets, is also a painter. In this film he explores the landscapes, urban and natural, which have inspired his work.

8

Piaf/What Did You Do in ' The Warp ' Daddy?

he sell-out success of this year's Royal Shakespeare season at Stratford is the musical, play. Piaf. Jane Lapotaire, television's Marie Curie , has won universal critical acclaim for her performance as the great French singer. Tonight JANE LAPOTAIRE talks about imitating the inimitable. What Did You Do in ' The Warp ' Daddy? A cast of 50 actors and musicians playing over 200 parts were commandeered by Ken Campbell for his marathon production of The Warp at London's ICA. They were there to perform an epic cycle of ten plays running an uninterrupted 22 hours. Arena was there to witness the event and to film the cast prior to their collapse.

9

Cinema: John Barry

JOHN BARRY (designer Star Wars and Superman) is now directing Saturn 3. RIDLEY SCOTT (The Duellists) is shooting The Alien. Gavin Millar reports on these two new British SF films.

10

Other Writers Will Tell You Different....

Lifers in prison cages, comedians in Hollywood, adolescents in the East End and female androids on the edge of the galaxy have all been subjects for Glasgow play-wright Tom McGrath in a career which started only in 1976. Arena profiles an original new talent. With extracts from The Hard Man and Mr Laurel and Mr Hardy. The Moving Picture Mime Show More like Tom and Jerry than Marcel Marceau , this highly unconventional group has attracted a cult following by combining traditional mime with their own fast-moving cartoon style. Unusual, original and very funny.

11

Cinema: Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert is 23 - ' a stunning actress ', says Claude Chabrol ; 'Best Actress ' at Cannes in 1978 for Violette Noziere , the new Chabrol thriller. We talk to her in Paris. Alberta Hunter is 83, a classic blues singer who performs the soundtrack of Alan Rudolph 's Remember my Name. We catch her singing at The Cookery, New York

12

Arena presents Ubu

The television premiere of GEOFF DUNBAR 'S brilliant animation film. Based on ALFRED JARRY 's notorious surrealist hero, Pere Ubu , it chronicles the rise to power of a kind of punk Macbeth, a lewd and unscrupulous despot with the mentality of a petit bourgeois and with absolutely no redeeming qualities. Ubu Roi was originally written by Jarry as a schoolboy in 1888 and eventually presented to an outraged public in 1896. For his version of the story Dun-bar has invented a brutal and graphic style to recreate the explosive impact of Jarry's original production.

13

The Origins Of My Way

David Bowie was the first person to write English lyrics to the original tune of what eventually became the global hit, My Way. Claude Francois, a big name in his native France, wrote and performed the original song called, Comme d’habitude which means ‘As Usual.’ It was quite common in the 60s for European hits to be picked up by British or American publishers, who would in turn commission somebody to apply an English lyric to the tune. You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me by Dusty Springfield is a good example, it was originally an Italian hit. The European publisher would make money from the re-version, the Brits and the American publishers would make money, so everybody ate.

14

Cinema: Don Siegel

Twenty-three years ago Don Siegel made his famous horrorpic Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Now there is a new Invasion, even more chilling than the original; make-up effects by the man who dreamed up the aliens in Close Encounters, special sound effects by the man who ' voiced' R2D2 in Star Wars. Gavin Millar talks to star Donald Sutherland and director Philip Kaufman.

14

Cinema: Don Siegel

Twenty-three years ago Don Siegel made his famous horrorpic Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Now there is a new Invasion, even more chilling than the original; make-up effects by the man who dreamed up the aliens in Close Encounters, special sound effects by the man who ' voiced' R2D2 in Star Wars. Gavin Millar talks to star Donald Sutherland and director Philip Kaufman.

15

La Dame aux Gladiolas: The Agony and the Ecstasy of Edna Everage

In this, the first-ever exclusive Arts Documentary about a living legend, our cameras probe and etch the enigma which is Dame Edna. Meet her in the privacy of her fabulously appointed penthouse suite atop the Dorchester Hotel, London, Wl. Witness the fabled finale of her current West End hit, A Night with Dame Edna. Visit her Melbourne home suburb, Moonee Ponds, now a national monument , . , and suffer with her the tears, terror and triumph as she daws her way to the top. Dame Edna talks fearlessly about her fame, her wealth and her humility, whilst wearing no less than ten unique couturier-simulated gowns. And much, much more. Dame Edna Everage is a division of the Barry Humphries group.

16

'Let Us Now Praise Famous Men ': Alabama 40 Years On

At the height of the American depression in the summer of 1936, t writer JAMES AGEE and photographer WALKER EVANS travelled south to Alabama. There they lived with a family of poor-white farmers recording their daily lives in intimate detail. What finally emerged was an extraordinary and personal account of deprivation and poverty. The book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men has become a classic. More than 40 years later Arena returned to Alabama, in the foot-steps of Agee and Evans, to trace the survivors of that original family.

17

Cinema: Kung Fu, Run Run Shaw and Bruce Lee

Everybody knows about Kung Fu, Run Run Shaw and Bruce Lee. They probably know less about the young film-makers who are trying to get a few of Hong Kong's more pressing problems on to the screen: over-crowding, poverty, refugees, and worries about China. There are, too, the glamorous invaders from Hollywood who see Hong Kong as another exotic backdrop where two hearts might beat as one. Candice Bergen has been there starring in Oliver's Story, the sequel to Love Story. Where's the neal Hong Kong gone? ' she asks.

18

Tell Us the Truth

Rock band Sham 69 have a large and loyal following of working-class kids, who call themselves 'The Sham Army'. They have a reputation for causing trouble and Sham concerts have often been t disrupted and brought to an end by fighting. Jimmy Pursey , the lead singer, has struggled to prevent these outbreaks but the violent and conflicting passions aroused at Sham concerts have placed him in an increasingly difficult position. sham's latest album That's Life portrays the pressures that face the kids who follow the band. Arena this week re-creates scenes from that album and follows the story of one Sham concert which threatened to explode.

19

The King and I

For David Oxtoby , Elvis is king. He's been painting rock 'n' roll stars since the 50s, much to the bemusement of the art establishment. Most of the paintings in this film-of Presley, Haley, Gene Vincent etc - were stolen and subsequently burnt by Italian bandits and so Arena presents a unique chance to view the work of this entertaining but ill-starred artist. Journey to the Surface of the Earth Last year the artist Mark Boyle attained the singular distinction of occupying the entire British pavilion at the Venice Biennaleastonishing visitors with a Sardinian mountainside, a ploughed field and a Liverpool pavement. Since pioneering light shows with Jimi Hendrix and the Soft Machine he has devoted his life to travelling the world, recreating with uncanny accuracy six-foot-square replicas of the Earth's surface.

20

Their Lips are Sealed

Arena presents a film about the strange art of ventriloquism with Tattersall and his amazing life-size doll ' I'd always dreamt of having a dummy which would enter stage walking like a human being.' 'Terri Rogers with her truculent partner Shorty * One night the audience took such a dislike to Shorty that someone actually punched him.' and Saveen with Daisy May , the Scowl, and the wonderful talking dog. ' Daisy May is actually a sex change. I made her as a boy then turned her into a little girl ...'

21

Pictures of the Mind

One in six people in Britain will spend some time in a mental hospital. For 50 years, painting or drawing have provided an important key to the problems of the mentally ill. This Arena film presents some of the extraordinary and moving pictures of the mind produced in Europe since the war.

22

Six Days in September

John Hoyland is reckoned by many both here and abroad to be this country's finest abstract painter. A key figure for younger artists and critics, he has been both loved and hated to excess. As a major retrospective of his work opens in London, here is a film that stays close to the artist during six days when he faces hostile criticism, starts a new painting and explains why, in bleaker moments, painting can seem ' like flicking away in a corner with a feather duster '.
Episode Description

1

Building for Change

Arena presents a profile of Richard Rogers , one of the most original and controversial talents in architecture today. It was Rogers, together with his Italian partner RENZO PIANO , who created the spectacular Beaubourg Arts Centre in Paris. Described variously as 'art hanger', oil refinery', 'cultural colossus ' - it looks like a giant meccano set, a bizarre and brightly coloured building rising out of the heart of traditional Paris streets. It caused a furore when first unveiled, but has now brought new life to the area, and attracts as many as 50,000 visitors a day, even more than Disneyland! British architect Rogers has now returned to England to embark on even more ambitious projects - startling new home for one of Britain's oldest institutions, Lloyds of London, and a huge and much-debated scheme to enliven London's South Bank, the Coin Street Project.

2

Lene Lovich - Sleeping Beauty

LENE LOVICH has now emerged as one of the most original performers in rock music.

2

Lene Lovich - Sleeping Beauty

LENE LOVICH has now emerged as one of the most original performers in rock music.

3

Mentioned in Dispatches

Arena presents the extraordinary story of Tim Page, war photographer and Vietnam legend-a tale first told in MICHAEL HERR'S celebrated book about Vietnam, Dispatches. 'People made Page sound crazy and ambitious, like the Sixties Kid, a stone-cold freak in a country where the madness raced up the hills and into the jungles ... he'd picked up a camera the way you or I would pick up a ticket, but he would go places for pictures that very few other photographers were going.' Page was wounded four times in Vietnam. The fourth and final time, he was logged ' dead on arrival'. But he survived against all the odds. Tonight he tells . his story.

4

Isaac Singer's Nightmare and Mrs Pupko's Beard

Arena presents a hilarious and touching portrait of the great Yiddish writer Isaac Bashevis Singer, filmed on location in Brooklyn, New York, and featuring friends, relatives and other ' odd-balls '. 'I wouldn't say that Yiddish is dead, neither would I say that Yiddish is blooming. I would say that Yiddish is sick. But in our history, between being sick and dying is a long, long way...

5

Peggy Taub, the Learned Goat and Other People ...

Peggy Taub has always wanted to sculpt like the classic Greeks. But whenever she leans over the clay bin an animal head appears. An American writer and artist who now lives in London, Peggy Taub's work centres on the belief that the main difference between people and animals 'lies in the placement of the ears'. Thalma Goldman We look at the work of one of the most original artist-animators around today. Her latest film Stanley has just been nominated as Britain's entry to the Berlin Film Festival.

6

Bring Me Back a Song

Irish folk music is one of the oldest unbroken cultural traditions in Europe. As the Sense of Ireland festival of arts comes to London, Arena presents some of the finest Irish musicians of today. In tonight's programme the Bothy Band and Planxty- two of the best folk groups of recent years - play and sing with their families and friends on location in Dublin and on the west coast of Ireland.

7

' I talk about me - I am Africa'

The growth of black consciousness through the 1970s has produced an explosion of original new theatre in black South Africa. At a secret performance in the backyard of a Soweto shop, a radical poet recites his banned work accompanied by drums and songs. In a ghetto hall, two men in chains portray their escape from prison and their dream of liberation - a dream that is shattered by the grim reality of working in Johan nesburg 's mines ' 6,000 feet underground ... in the dusty caves of gold '. And the women of Crossroads shanty town re-enact their fight with the police and the bulldozers which have harassed them for years. Tonight's film investigates the remarkable emergence of a vivid and defiant theatrical life.

8

Rudies Come Back or The Rise and Rise of 2-Tone

Adrian Thrills investigates a new and exhilarating musical blend which is taking the country by storm. 2-tone is a unique mix of music, fusing together reggae, rock, soul, ska, blue beat and punk. With its home in Coventry and its roots in reggae, it derives its name and identity from the co-existence of its black and white members.

8

Rudies Come Back or The Rise and Rise of 2-Tone

Adrian Thrills investigates a new and exhilarating musical blend which is taking the country by storm. 2-tone is a unique mix of music, fusing together reggae, rock, soul, ska, blue beat and punk. With its home in Coventry and its roots in reggae, it derives its name and identity from the co-existence of its black and white members.

9

Working At It

A profile of Liverpool playwright Alan Bleasdale With two new productions packing them in, in the North of England, ALAN BLEASDALE continues to build on the popular success of his TV plays The Black Stuff and Scully's New Year's Eve. Arena looks at the people and places - the tarmac gang, the school, the hospital and the docks around which he has woven his plays. 'I didn't know what a proscenium arch was till I was into my fourth play ... I'm writing about people and emotions, people at work, people in conflict ... I suppose I'm really writing about " laughter and tears ".'

10

Left: Andrea Dunbar Right: Victoria Wood

As prizewinning writer/performer Victoria Wood opens in her latest play, Good Fun, Arena looks at her talent to amuse through her witty and engaging songs. And we profile teenage playwright Andrea Dunbar , whose remarkable first play, The Arbor, is now running at the Royal Court. Written when she was only 15, it draws on her own experience as a schoolgirl mother.

11

Climb Every Mountain or Nothing Succeeds Like Failure

"Failure can be fun' is the motto of self-confessed failures David McGillivray and Stephen Pile (above-if RADIO TIMES had only been able to take a picture of him). McGillivray was commissioned to write a book about failure but failed to write it; Pile's Book of Heroic Failures has got into the best-sellers list. This unlucky break has resulted in Pile being thrown out of the Not Terribly Good Club of Great Britain, which he founded. Among others they meet-GEOFF O'NEILL, author of 519 unpublished songs; MIRIAM HARGRAVE , veteran of 39 driving tests; LT-CDR BILL BOAKS , who has lost his deposit at 21 by-elections, and JAN TAIGEN , who scored no points whatsoever in the 1978 Eurovision Song Contest. Reginald Bosanquet will be reading from the Book of Heroic Failures.

12

Arena presents Double Vision

The story of an unusual collaboration between rock musician Brian Eno and artist illustrator Russell Mills. The 65 works in Russell Mills' new series of paintings provide a remarkable visual counterpoint for 38 of Brian Eno's songs. It's a project they have both pursued obsessively for over seven years. 'I see myself,' says Mills, 'as a kind of explorer. Given the music and lyrics as a starting point, I set off into alien territory in search of a visual solution to the songs.' plus Rainbow Hughes Painter Patrick Hughes pursues rainbows in St Ives, in search of visual puns, paradoxes and jokes.

13

Dedicated Followers of Fashion

The outrageous hats of designer David Shilling, modelled by his mother Gertrude - doyenne of Ascot Day..."One Ascot I wore a Christmas tree hat with lots of glass balls on - the same one I wore when I was elected Oddball of the Year by the Export Clothing Federation." and "Seams Like A Dream" A bizarre musical entertainment from 'Swankey Modes'. Mel, Judy, Esmé and Willie - four girls who have created a unique fashion house in a corner shop in Camden Town launch their new collection in a most unusual way...

14

Luck and Flaw

One after another mighty politicians have fallen victim to the savage caricatures of Peter Fluck and Roger Law , better known as Luck and Flaw. Among their most memorable targets are Henry Kissinger as the Statue of Liberty, Jeremy Thorpe as Saint Sebastian and Keith Joseph as Dracula. Uncannily modelled in plasticine, the victims are then photographed for magazines and newspapers all over the world. The results are bizarre, witty and unapologetically extreme.

15

In Their Own Image

Two women photographers turn the camera on themselves ... Time Release For over a year Linda Benedict -Jones photographed herself, by using the time release on her Pentax camera. The results-studies in and out of doors, at home, in hospital, in the bath and in the bedroom - provide a witty and sometimes poignant self-portrait of this extremely talented photographer. Facing Up to Myself At the age of 40, having spent most of her working life photographing other people for a liv ing, Jo Spence began to have serious doubts about what she was doing and why. Overnight she stopped taking photographs altogether and turned instead to an exploration of her own image as seen by others - snapshots of herself from the family album. It began as a kind of therapy and ended as an exhibition called Beyond the Family Album, which Jo Spence hopes will help others to see beyond the smiling images in their own family albums.

16

Making The Shining

Stanley Kubrick allowed his then 17-year-old daughter, Vivian, to make a documentary about the production of The Shining. Created originally for the BBC television show Arena, this documentary offers rare insight into the shooting process of a Kubrick film.

17

Dire Straits

Not so long ago they were playing in London pubs. This week - 16 platinum discs, 21 gold and a triumphant world tour later, Dire Straits return to the London stage. Tonight's Arena film features the superb concert they played on their last visit to The Rainbow, and band members talk about their music and the pressures and consequences of their astonishing success.
Episode Description

1

Chelsea Hotel

Documentary about the Chelsea Hotel in New York, a legendary haven for the some of the greatest artistic talent of the 20th century, from Mark Twain to Dylan Thomas. Andy Warhol and William Burroughs have dinner in the room where Arthur C Clarke wrote 2001, and Quentin Crisp, who lived in the hotel for more than 35 years, recalls moving in.

2

Hazell Meets His Makers

Programme looking at the creative processes that go into the creation of the stories about private detective James Hazell, with short scenarios on the character .

3

Getting Away From Sidney

Documentary profile of the Graeae Theatre Company, a company of disabled actors and their play "Sideshow" which deals with the way in which his disabled charges get rid of "Uncle Sidney", a kindly soul incharge of their disabled institution.

4

Private Worlds

Documentary on two very individual English Artists. Sam Smith, who carves wooden toys and models evocative of the Edwardian era, and Chris Orr, illustrator of the minutes of suburbia.

5

Today Carshalton Beeches,,,Tomorrow, Croydon

Documentary whcih looks at the role of Radio One D.J. John Peel and his producer John Walters have had in the encouragement of rock bands who have yet to break through into commercial recording.

6

Edward Hopper

Documentary on Edward Hopper, american painter, whose work is the subject of an exhibition in London at the moment.

7

Stages

Documentary on the staging of The Ik in a quarry near Adelaide in australia by Peter Brook's travelling theatre company. Tribal Aboriginal performers travelled 1000's of miles to see the performance, along with popular plays presented by them.

8

The Smallest Theatre...

Documentary looking at Britain's smallest theatre, run in Scotland by Barrie and Marrianne Hesketh for the last seventeen years, in which they take all the part s, design and direct all the shows.

9

Huston's Hobby

Documentary profile of film director John Huston.

10

A Walk With Amos Oz

Documentary profile of leading Israeli writer, Amos Oz in which he talks about t he thirty year history of the Israeli state whilst touring his home city of Jerusalem.

11

God's Fifth Columinist

Film Portrait of William Gerhardie who died in 1977, whose book Bod's Fifth Colu mn was published in 1981. Michael Holroyd discusses Gerhardie's life and work a nd introduces an interview recorded in 1971.

12

Did You Miss Me?

Profile of pop singer Gary Glitter, who "retired" in 1976 and who was soon hopelessly in debt, but whose career has shown recent signs of revival.

13

The Return Of Lupino Lane

Programme which looks at some of the films of silent film comedian Lupino Lane, whose work was mostly destroyed when his studio went bankrupt in the twenties. However exracts from 14 of his restored films are featured here.

14

.The Comic Strip Hero

Documentary which looks at the making of the comicbook hero Superman, with inter views with actors Kirk Alyn, Christopher Reeve, Dr Fredric Wertham, Joanna (the model for Lois Lane) and the creators of the character Jerry Seigel and Joe Shuster

15

Arena on Clair

Programme which looks at the life and work of French film director Rene Clair and his work in France and Hollywood. With Leslie Caron, Gina Lollobrigida, Jean- Pierre Cassel, Claude Autant-Lara and Michel Boisrond.

16

Somewhere Over The Rainbow...

Profile of american painter Robert Natkin, who talks about the early influences on his life.

17

If The Music Had To Stop...

Documentary which examines the effects of the cuts in education spending on Britain's Youth Orchestras, looking in particular at the example of Leicestershire schools.

18

Curtains?

Documentary looking at the future of the National Youth Theatre, looking at its history and the financial threats to its future exsistance. With interviews with Sir Ralph Richardson, Kate Adie, Martin Jarvis, Peter Terson, Helen Mirren.

19

The Cinema Of Andrzej Wajda

Documentary in which Polish film director Wajda is interviewed in Warsaw and Cra cow shortly after receiving the Palm D'Or award at the Cannes Film Festival. He talks about his films and his avoidance of censorship as a film-maker in Poland.

20

"I Thought I Was Taller"-A Short History Of Mel Brooks

Portrait of comedy film writer, director and sometime actor, Mel Brooks filmed on location in Hollywood with Gene Wilder, Dom de Louise and Sid Caeser.

21

Have You Seen The Mona Lisa?

Documentary about the image on the Mona Lisa and the various contexts in which the image can be seen throughout the world.

22

Let Them Know We're Here

Documentary which looks at the development of an idea for a play by Hanif Kureishi through the group improvisation and ideas of the Joint Stock Theatre Company to the first performance of the finished play, Borderline.

23

A Pretty British Affair

Documentary on British film-makers Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger who talk about their career in partnership which produced some now-acknowledged "classics" of British Cinema, with comment from Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese.

24

The Art of Radio Times - Private Eye

Since 1923 the Radio Times has been a leader in design & illustration & Eric Fraser one of its regular contributors talks about his work.> Through out the film covers & illustrations from the Radio Times from 1923 to the present day are featured with a soundtrack composed of excerpts from radio progs incl music, sport, comedy, lectures & early radio announcements. Eric FRASER talks about his change of style from humour to a more serious style since the war, his favourite type of work & how he manages to work to a script & produce designs very quickly. The intv with Fraser & vars hm working on an illustration are intercut through out the film. Name FRASER, Eric

25

A Tall Story - How Salman Rushdie Pickled All India

Documentary which features the view of Booker prize-winning author Salman Rushdie of India through the eyes of his hero from the novel `Midnight's Children', Saleem Sinai.

26

Brixton To Barbados

Documentary in which Jamaican-born poet Linton Kwesi Johnson, now resident in Brixton, visits Carifesta, a festival of West Indian culture held in Barbados, and surveys a small part of the very diverse cultural activity of the Islands. Performers include: South Stars - Trinidad; Network - Trinidad; Shake Keane - St Vincent; Bahamas National Dance Company; The Soulful Groovers - the Bahamas; Rebirth; the Renegades - Trinidad; Drama Group - Montserrat; the Mighty Arrow - Montserrat; Chronicle Atlantic Symphony Steel Orchestra; Michael Smith - Jamaica; the Dicey Doh Singers - Bahamas; the Mighty Sparrow - Trinidad; Irakere - Cuba.
Episode Description

1

The Private Life of the Ford Cortina

This quirky Arena, made in 1982, looks back to a time when the humble Ford Cortina was the most popular, and the most stolen, car in Britain.

2

What Makes Rabbit Run?

ohn Updike 's new book, Rabbit is Rich, is the third in the Rabbit series from the author of Rabbit, Run, Couples and The Coup. At 50, Updike is at the height of h s powers and reputation. His novels amount to a chronicle of Middle America in the liberated and disillusioned post-Kennedy years. 'Many of my books and stories involve a bourgeois home being disrupted by sex ... Maybe 1 should pay more attention to the fact that these homes were basically established by sex as well.' Art, sex and religion; he has described these as the Three Great Secret Things, and in this film, the first full-length study of Updike, he looks at his own life and art in the light of his strictly religious Pennsylvania past, and wonders about the drives that make Rabbit run.

2

What Makes Rabbit Run?

ohn Updike 's new book, Rabbit is Rich, is the third in the Rabbit series from the author of Rabbit, Run, Couples and The Coup. At 50, Updike is at the height of h s powers and reputation. His novels amount to a chronicle of Middle America in the liberated and disillusioned post-Kennedy years. 'Many of my books and stories involve a bourgeois home being disrupted by sex ... Maybe 1 should pay more attention to the fact that these homes were basically established by sex as well.' Art, sex and religion; he has described these as the Three Great Secret Things, and in this film, the first full-length study of Updike, he looks at his own life and art in the light of his strictly religious Pennsylvania past, and wonders about the drives that make Rabbit run.

2

What Makes Rabbit Run?

ohn Updike 's new book, Rabbit is Rich, is the third in the Rabbit series from the author of Rabbit, Run, Couples and The Coup. At 50, Updike is at the height of h s powers and reputation. His novels amount to a chronicle of Middle America in the liberated and disillusioned post-Kennedy years. 'Many of my books and stories involve a bourgeois home being disrupted by sex ... Maybe 1 should pay more attention to the fact that these homes were basically established by sex as well.' Art, sex and religion; he has described these as the Three Great Secret Things, and in this film, the first full-length study of Updike, he looks at his own life and art in the light of his strictly religious Pennsylvania past, and wonders about the drives that make Rabbit run.

3

Here They Kill People for It

Osip Mandelstam, one of the greatest poets of the 20th century, died in a prison camp somewhere in Siberia in the 1930s: no one knows precisely how or when. He was imprisoned not for his political activity but for writing a poem. All we know of the life of this remarkable man comes from two classic books by his widow, Nadezhda Mandelstam : Hope Against Hope and Hope Abandoned. In tonight's Arena, poet and novelist D. M. Thomas , author of The White Hotel, traces the the career of this great lyric poet, with the help of Joseph Brodsky , exiled Russian poet, and Nadezhda Mandelstam. filmed secretly in her Moscow flat in 1973 and seen here for the first time on British tv.

4

True to Life?

In a month of continuing controversy about the aims and methods of the ' documentary', Arena presents a classic film by one of the pioneers of the movement-Humphrey Jennings 's Listen to Britain. Made in 1941, it will be seen here, complete, for the first time on British television. Also Gavin Millar looks at the craft of recent documentary makers, focusing on the techniques of the BBC's current Police series. With Roger Graef , Charles Stewart and the team who made it.

5

Desert Island Discs

Arena celebrates Roy Plomley's Desert Island Discs with the help of many celebrity castaways, including Paul McCartney, Frankie Howerd, Russell Harty, Trevor Brooking, the Lord Mayor of London, Professor J.K. Galbraith and Arthur Askey. The special guest for the 40th anniversary programme was Paul McCartney who was also a fan of the show: "I love its homeliness. It conjures up the best in traditional British pleasure, like the great British breakfast. It's an honour to be asked."

6

Arena presents

Arena presents two classic films from the early days of documentary. Featured in last month's True to Life? edition, they're shown complete for the first time on British television. Listen to Britain made in 1941 by HUMPHREY JEN NINGS, is a poetic evocation of the spirit with which - and for which - Britain was fighting the war. Housing Problems made in 1935 by arthur ELTON and EDGAR ANSTEY , simply ' reported ' from the heart of London's East End slums, giving ordinary people a voice for the first time in cinema history. The 'father' of documentary, John Grierson hoped it would give people ' a living sense of what is going on'. In quite different ways, both these films did exactly that. Introduced by Gavin Millar

7

The Orson Welles Story: Part One

Two-part film profile of Orson Welles, looking at his life and career in theatre, radio and particularly film. Part One with Jeanne Moreau, John Huston, Peter Bogdanovitch, Robert Wise, Charlton Heston, and a detailed interview with Welles himself. This part deals with his work up to Touch of Evil.

8

The Orson Welles Story: Part Two

Two-part film profile of Orson Welles, looking at his life and career in theatre, radio and particularly film. This is the second of the two-part profile of Orson Welles, looking at films including The Trial, Chimes at Midnight, The Immortal Story and F for Fake and discussing his many unfinished projects, including The Other Side of the Wind and Don Quixote.

9

Mike Leigh Making Plays

Explores the early career of the English writer and film director Mike Leigh and the actor-centered process of collaborative creation that he has developed in his devised dramas for theatre, television, and the cinema.

10

A Genius Like Us: A Portrait of Joe Orton

11

A Play for Bridport

One of the most spectacular and unlikely theatre events of last year took place a long way from the West End of London in the small Dorset town of Bridport. The Poor Man's Friend, written by playwright Howard Barker and performed by hundreds of towns-people, was the inspiration of Ann ellicoe, best known as the author of The Knack. During the past five years her ambition to create true community theatre has produced amazing results. HOWARD BARKER 'S play looks at the history of the town where in the 19th century the best hanging-rope was made and focuses on the dubious figure of Dr Roberts, inventor of the famous patent medicine known as ' The Poor Man's Friend'. Tonight Arena follows the making of the production, chronicling the scenes on and off the stage as the whole of Bridport becomes absorbed in telling a story from their past.

11

A Play for Bridport

One of the most spectacular and unlikely theatre events of last year took place a long way from the West End of London in the small Dorset town of Bridport. The Poor Man's Friend, written by playwright Howard Barker and performed by hundreds of towns-people, was the inspiration of Ann ellicoe, best known as the author of The Knack. During the past five years her ambition to create true community theatre has produced amazing results. HOWARD BARKER 'S play looks at the history of the town where in the 19th century the best hanging-rope was made and focuses on the dubious figure of Dr Roberts, inventor of the famous patent medicine known as ' The Poor Man's Friend'. Tonight Arena follows the making of the production, chronicling the scenes on and off the stage as the whole of Bridport becomes absorbed in telling a story from their past.

11

A Play for Bridport

One of the most spectacular and unlikely theatre events of last year took place a long way from the West End of London in the small Dorset town of Bridport. The Poor Man's Friend, written by playwright Howard Barker and performed by hundreds of towns-people, was the inspiration of Ann ellicoe, best known as the author of The Knack. During the past five years her ambition to create true community theatre has produced amazing results. HOWARD BARKER 'S play looks at the history of the town where in the 19th century the best hanging-rope was made and focuses on the dubious figure of Dr Roberts, inventor of the famous patent medicine known as ' The Poor Man's Friend'. Tonight Arena follows the making of the production, chronicling the scenes on and off the stage as the whole of Bridport becomes absorbed in telling a story from their past.

12

Upon Westminster Bridge

It is commonly thought that poets are-university-trained intellectuals who occasionally produce slim volumes about their personal feelings. This is not so with Michael Smith. Smith, an electrifying performer, is an exponent of ' dub ' poetry - which draws on talk culture, reggae music and the rich rhythms of Caribbean native speech. At school in Jamaica Smith was taught the standard works of English Literature but poems about ' The Daffodils ' and ' Westminster Bridge ' had little relevance to his upbringing in the ghettos of Kingston. Tonight's Arena follows Smith on his recent British tour and features the great Marxist historian C. L. R. James, Lynton Kwesi Johnson , the pioneer of dub poetry, and film of the late Boh Marley.

13

Eddie Cochran: Three Steps To Heaven

Documentary which looks at the life and premature death of rock n' Roll star Eddie Cochran, with comment from Larry Parnes, Adam Faith, Marty Wilde, Joe Brown, Cochran's mother and his fiancee Sharon Sheeley.

14

Angus McBean

For nearly 50 years everybody who was anybody in the British theatre passed before the lens of Angus McBean - Gielgud, Olivier, Thorndike, Coward ... He was known as the photographer who resolutely flattered his sitters. Tonight, after a ten-year absence. McBean demonstrates his skill with his old friend Sir Ralph Richardson. He discusses for the first time his astonishing surreal pictures of the 30s and 40s. And photographer Jo Spence faces up to herself and looks beyond the smiling pictures in her own family album.

15

Happy Days

Arena presents the first programme in a Samuel Beckett Season providing a unique opportunity to see famous interpretations of his work. The playwright himself directed this production of his classic play Happy Days, and BILLIE WHITELAW , Beckett's favourite actress, plays Winnie - one of the strangest parts in modern theatre. Winnie, buried to her waist in a sandy mound, struggles to get through her day, searching for distractions that will stave off the panic of having nothing to say, nothing to do, no reason to continue living. Willie, her husband, offers little help. Out of this bizarre and improbable setting Beckett makes a play with many comic and touching moments. Introduced by Martin Esslin

16

Eh Joe

continues the Samuel Beckett season starring Jack MaeGowran A rare opportunity to see an early television premiere. Recorded in 1966, tonight's presentation has only one visible actor, the late JACK MACGOWRAN who, with Patrick Magee , was one of the principal interpreters of Samuel Beckett 's work. Unseen is an actress, Sian Phillips. She is the voice of a woman whom Joe once loved. He sits remembering, and his memories recall a life whose hypocrisy and faithlessness have brought tragedy-as much for Joe as for the woman. Introduced by Martin Esslin

17

Rockaby

Arena continues the Samuel Beckett Season with a unique record of his new play Rockaby which has just opened at the National Theatre. Premiered in America, it was filmed in rehearsal and performance by the celebrated film maker D.A. Pennebaker. The programme follows Billie Whitelaw's preparations for her latest Beckett role: 'People think because I do this I'm well read and knowledgeable and know what it means. In fact, I have no education at all. Beckett blows the notes... they just come out of me....' Attend the opening night in Buffalo; New York, and see the strange and haunting play, and the old woman rocking herself into death...

18

am Not I

continues the Samuel Beckett Season In one of the most extraordinary pieces of modern drama Billie Whitelaw , Beckett's foremost interpreter, performs this astonishing tour de force. Not I - the mouth suspended in space, caused a sensation when it was first performed at the Royal Court in 1973. Beckett himself is a great admirer of this television version.

19

Quad

continues the Samuel Beckett Season with a premiere A play without words. Quad has a musical structure. It is a kind of canon or catch-a mysterious square-dance. Four hooded figures move along the sides of the square. Each has his own particular itinerary. A pattern emerges and collisions are just avoided. From these permutations, Beckett, as writer and director creates an image of life that is both highly charged and strangely funny. Introduced by Martin Esslin Assistant director bruno voces

20

Krapp's Last Tape

concludes the Samuel Beckett Season One of the best-known Beckett monologues starring its creator, the late Patrick Magee Krapp, an old man, is alone with his memories and the reels of tape he has recorded during his life. As he reviews the years listening to his diary, he finally makes a conclusion about the most important thing that ever happened to him. Introduced by MARTIN ESSLIN

21

Guernica - The Long Exile

Last year a £13-million painting travelled in top secret from America to Spain. Next day it was headline news that Picasso's masterpiece ' Guernica ' had come home at last, after 40 years in exile. This Arena special tells the story of an extraordinary work of art, and talks to survivors of the terrible event that inspired it.
Episode Description

1

Last Waltz In Vienna

On Saturday 26 February 1938, 17-year-old Georg Klaar went to his first ball in Vienna. It was also his last. Two weeks later Hitler annexed Austria. The comfortable world of Georg and his family was utterly destroyed. ' Originally I thought it would be nice for my children to hear about their family, a family they never met, never knew. That was the beginning. Then I found out that you can't just write a family story....' Tonight Georg Klaar , now George Clare , tells his story. Based on his widely acclaimed autobiography, the film traces the fortunes of three generations of Viennese Jews through a troubled period of Austrian history. It begins in Vienna in the 1860s and ends in September 1942 in a tiny village in France from which his parents were to make their last journey. It is this small village which is at the heart of George Clare 's search for his family past - a personal attempt to record the rich cultural heritage which he absorbed and to lay the ghost of a recurring nightmare.

2

Classically Cuban: Alicia Alonso and the Cuban National Ballet

Today, in post-revolutionary Cuba, under the benign patronage of Fidel Castro, classical ballet thrives. This unlikely success story is mainly due to the legendary figure of Alicia Alonso. After almost 20 years as an internationally acclaimed star of the American ballet, she returned to support the Revolution in 1959, determined to create from scratch a national ballet company. Now aged over 60, her long career frequently threatened by failing eyesight, Alicia Alonso is still Cuba's prima ballerina, still performing Giselle and still the formidable leader of a huge company of dancers, all of them now trained and recruited within Cuba.

3

Hair - By their hair shall ye know them....

Tonight Arena takes you on a tour of contemporary British heads, from the exotic to the mundane, from hot wax to Brylcreem. Blue rinse, quiff, mohican, short back and sides, dreadlocks or just shaved off altogether. By your choice of hairstyle you tell the world about yourself. You can blend in with the crowd or stand out from it. For some it is a fundamental part of their religious beliefs, for others pure indulgence. What are the prospects for a bank clerk with a hennaed 'trojan '? How does a white man become a Rasta? Does the back of your neck still prickle at the thought of the barber's clippers? This Arena investigation will make your hair stand on end.

4

Boulez Now

Pierre Boulez, leading composer of the post-war generation, later a powerful and innovative conductor, is now the head of an extraordinary experimental studio in Paris. This huge underground music laboratory was built especially for Boulez beneath the Pompidou Centre. Here for the past-seven years, accompanied by computers and music assistants, he has been developing his.most ambitious work to date - "Répons". It had a huge success at last year's Proms. In tonight's film he shares his ideas and methods of working, introducing. extracts from "Répons" and describes his enthusiasm for opening a window on a new world of sound.

4

Boulez Now

Pierre Boulez, leading composer of the post-war generation, later a powerful and innovative conductor, is now the head of an extraordinary experimental studio in Paris. This huge underground music laboratory was built especially for Boulez beneath the Pompidou Centre. Here for the past-seven years, accompanied by computers and music assistants, he has been developing his.most ambitious work to date - "Répons". It had a huge success at last year's Proms. In tonight's film he shares his ideas and methods of working, introducing. extracts from "Répons" and describes his enthusiasm for opening a window on a new world of sound.

5

Jazz Juke Box

George Melly presents films of the greatest names of swing jazz - but with a difference. Some were made for visual juke boxes which flourished in the early 40s, others are promotional shorts from the major Hollywood companies. The forerunners of today's rock promos, these gems are by turns witty, moving, surreal and always irresistibly entertaining. The line-up includes Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong Billy Holliday , Fats Waller Bessie Smith and the three kings of boogie-woogie, Meade Lux Lewis , Albert Ammons and Pete Johnson.

6

Burroughs

Documentary on the life of William S. Burroughs.

7

The Catherine Wheel

Tonight Arena presents one of the most ambitious dance projects ever seen on television. The Catherine Wheel combines the talents of Twyla Tharp , one of America's most imaginative choreographers, and David Byrne , leader of the rock band TALKING HEADS, who composed and performed this original music score. The starting point of the dance is the image of a Catherine wheel and the unattainable ideal of physical and moral perfection which St Catherine herself aspired to. Energy, benign and malevolent, is the central theme of the work, which builds to a spectacular climax of virtuoso dancing in the final Golden Section. When premiered on Broadway the New Yorker referred to The Catherine Wheel as a 'major event in our theatre' with dancing of ' astonishing beauty and power'.

8

Kurt Vonnegut: So It Goes

In this timeless interview, Kurt Vonnegut - iconoclastic writer of science fiction and satire - discusses his family history, how he got his start as an author, his experiences in World War II, his obsession with the betrayal of humankind by science, and his vision of technology gone mad. Delving into the psyches of his characters, he even enters into a dialogue with his fictional alter ego, Kilgore Trout. Dramatizations and excerpts from Slaughterhouse Five, Breakfast of Champions, Cat's Cradle and Deadeye Dick bring the offbeat yet vivid world of Vonnegut's stories to life.

9

It's All True

Tonight Arena takes an extraordinary journey through the video age. Video pirates, video trials, video weddings, video graves.... Fifty years ago it was just the dream of a science fiction future - now It's All True. With Sir Michael Hordem Dandy Nichols, Stephen Berkoff, Mel Brooks, Koo Stark Ray Davies, Mari Wilson Grace Jones and Orson Welles

9

It's All True

Tonight Arena takes an extraordinary journey through the video age. Video pirates, video trials, video weddings, video graves.... Fifty years ago it was just the dream of a science fiction future - now It's All True. With Sir Michael Hordem Dandy Nichols, Stephen Berkoff, Mel Brooks, Koo Stark Ray Davies, Mari Wilson Grace Jones and Orson Welles

9

It's All True

Tonight Arena takes an extraordinary journey through the video age. Video pirates, video trials, video weddings, video graves.... Fifty years ago it was just the dream of a science fiction future - now It's All True. With Sir Michael Hordem Dandy Nichols, Stephen Berkoff, Mel Brooks, Koo Stark Ray Davies, Mari Wilson Grace Jones and Orson Welles

10

The Life and Times of Don Luis Bunuel

The great Luis Bunucl died last month. Born in 1900, he was un-disputably one of the outstanding creative figures of the 20th century. Tonight Gavin Millar introduces a ten-week season of his films, beginning tonight at 9.25, which will culminate in the autumn with an exclusive Arena profile about his life.

11

Borges and I

Tonight the new series of Arena opens with a unique profile of one of the great literary figures of our time, the blind Argentine poet and storyteller, Jorge Luis Borges. Now 84, he is the acknowledged master of the rich new literature of South America. Above all, Borges's stories are a dazzling exploration of his own mind and his own limitless curiosity. His magical tales are often rooted in puzzles and paradoxes. Imagine a man who can forget absolutely nothing, a knife that mysteriously controls the destinies of those who handle it, a point in space that contains everything that exists. Bringing together an exotic miscellany of incident and reference, Borges's work draws on the extraordinary landscape of Argentina and Uruguay-with their traditions of gauchos, horses, and old-time knife fighters-and on his profound and vivid love of books, especially those of other times and other places. Filmed in Uruguay, Buenos Aires and Paris, tonight's programme re-creates some of Borges's most memorable stories, among them Death and the Compass, The Meeting and Funes the Memorious.

12

Bette Davis - The Benevolent Volcano

Dear boy, you are out oj your mind, this woman will annihilate you, she will grind you to a fine powder and blow you away ... Director JOSEPH MANKIEWICZ recalls the warning he was given by a colleague when he offered Bette Davis the lead role in All About Eve. BETTE DAVIS is undoubtedly one of the most original stars Hollywood has ever produced, and in this exclusive interview, filmed on her 70th birthday, she is as formidable as ever. With great candour, she takes us through a career that spans a turbulent half-century. She has seen both sides of the precarious world of the movies-she tells of her triumphs, including two Oscars and ten nominations - but she also recalls vividly her years in the wilderness. Anne Baxter , Geraldine Fitzgerald Olivia de Havilland and Joseph Mankiewicz contribute to this extraordinary story. ' I had an amazingly dual life, not only did so much happen to me professionally, so much kept happening to me personally. It was totally incredible that a little, shy Yankee girl from Boston led the life she led.' Narrated by Ian Holm

13

Anthony Powell - An Invitation to the Dance

ANTHONY POWELL 'S 12-volume epic, A Dance to the Music of Time, is widely regarded as the most formidable single work of British fiction since the war. It is also largely entertaining: its cast of 400 characters ranges from upper-class drawing-rooms to Bohemian Lon don, and a violent death in a hippie commune. They have, in their turn, gathered a devoted set of fans among English-speaking readers. Tonight's portrait of Powell includes tributes from such admirers as Clive James , Kingsley Amis, Alison Lurie , Robert Conquest and Hilary Spurling. Most of all, Powell himself talks about his work, which is illustrated by James Fox , as the narrator, and with drawings by Marc.

14

Jazz Juke-Box II

Following the success of Jazz Juke-Box I, George Melly presents another selection of jazz shorts and ' soundies ' - the delightful films made for visual juke-boxes in the early 40s. He is joined by great jazzman Slim Gaillard, famous for such hits as ' Flat foot floogie ' and ' Dunkin' bagel'. Gaillard recalls swing's heyday and its legends -Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong and Nat King Cole. Jazz Juke-Box I - A string of pearls from the swing era.

15

The GPO Story

The GPO Film Unit-50 years old this year-went where no Hollywood film studio would dare to go in 1933. Down the mines, across the Alps, through the storms of the North Sea ... they really were a dedicated and intrepid group ot film makers. Held together by a dour and dynamic Scot, John Gnerson— the man who first coined the word documentary-they made some of the greatest factual films of the 1930s which still provide a fascinating insight into the everyday life of the time. Tonight Arena tells the story of this remarkable period of British cinema.

16

The Everly Brothers Reunion Concert

An Arena special Last September at the Royal Albert Hall Don and Phil Everly performed together for the first time in ten years. The concert was the popular music event of the year. With a fine band, including lead guitarist Albert Lee and Pete Wingfield on keyboards, the Everlys faithfully re-created the sound of their huge repertoire of hits. 'Cathy's clown', All I have to do is dream', 'When will I be loved', 'Wake up, little Susie' and the rest stirred the memories and emotions of a rapturous audience. The Everlys' harmonies are among the most special sounds in rock 'n' roll-and they sound as good as ever.

17

George Orwell: Part 1 - Such, Such Were the Joys

From a very early age, perhaps the age of 5 or 6, 1 knew that when I grew up I should be a writer ...One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.' George Orwell is one of the greatest writers England has produced. Tonight and for the next four nights Arena presents a unique full-scale portrait of this remarkable man, filmed in the places where he lived and worked and told in his own words and the words of those who knew him. The first programme traces Orwell upbringing in a sedate middle-class home near Henley, his horrific experiences at preparatory school, his years at Eton and as a military policeman in Burma-and closes with his sudden and dramatic emergence as a writer with Down and Out in London and Paris, a book drawn from his experiences among vagrants, tramps and outcasts. Among those appearing are Jacintha Buddicon Sir John Grotrion

17

George Orwell: Part 2 - Road to Wigan Pier

'Whichever way you turn this curse of class difference confronts you like a wall of stone. Or rather, it is not so much like a stone wall as the plate-glass pane of an aquarium. It is so easy to pretend that it isn t there, ana so impossible to get through it. Tonight's episode of the five-part Arena biography tells the story of Orwell's marriage to Eileen O'Shaughnessy , his growing political awareness and retraces what was to be the most important journey of his life-the trip he made to Wigan and the industrial north in 1936, in an attempt to understand the embittered and divided working class of the 30s. Among those appearing are Sir Richard Rees , Kay Ekkeval Geoffrey Gorer and the people ot Wigan and Barnsley.
Episode Description

1

George Orwell Part 3: Homage to Catalonia

'I remember saying once to Arthur Koestler "history stopped in 1936", at which he nodded in immediate understanding. We were both thinking of totalitarianism in general, but more particularly of the Spanish Civil War ... I know it is the fashion to say that most of recorded history is lies anyway but what is peculiar to our own age is the abandonment of the idea that history could be truthfully written.' Orwell, like many of his generation, enlisted to fight on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War. Filmed in Barcelona and on the Huesca front, where he fought, tonight's film tells the story of Orwell's war. It begins as a heroic crusade for a beleaguered socialist state, and ends with disillusion and betrayal, with Orwell fleeing across the Spanish frontier, a wounded and wanted man. Among those appearing are Stafford Cottman, Victor Alba Enrique Ardroer , Ramon Jurado and Professor Bernard Crick

1

George Orwell Part 3: Homage to Catalonia

'I remember saying once to Arthur Koestler "history stopped in 1936", at which he nodded in immediate understanding. We were both thinking of totalitarianism in general, but more particularly of the Spanish Civil War ... I know it is the fashion to say that most of recorded history is lies anyway but what is peculiar to our own age is the abandonment of the idea that history could be truthfully written.' Orwell, like many of his generation, enlisted to fight on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War. Filmed in Barcelona and on the Huesca front, where he fought, tonight's film tells the story of Orwell's war. It begins as a heroic crusade for a beleaguered socialist state, and ends with disillusion and betrayal, with Orwell fleeing across the Spanish frontier, a wounded and wanted man. Among those appearing are Stafford Cottman, Victor Alba Enrique Ardroer , Ramon Jurado and Professor Bernard Crick

1

George Orwell Part 3: Homage to Catalonia

'I remember saying once to Arthur Koestler "history stopped in 1936", at which he nodded in immediate understanding. We were both thinking of totalitarianism in general, but more particularly of the Spanish Civil War ... I know it is the fashion to say that most of recorded history is lies anyway but what is peculiar to our own age is the abandonment of the idea that history could be truthfully written.' Orwell, like many of his generation, enlisted to fight on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War. Filmed in Barcelona and on the Huesca front, where he fought, tonight's film tells the story of Orwell's war. It begins as a heroic crusade for a beleaguered socialist state, and ends with disillusion and betrayal, with Orwell fleeing across the Spanish frontier, a wounded and wanted man. Among those appearing are Stafford Cottman, Victor Alba Enrique Ardroer , Ramon Jurado and Professor Bernard Crick

2

George Orwell Part 4: The Lion and the Unicorn

For a brief period after the Spanish Civil War, Orwell was a revolutionary socialist, violently opposed to the coming war with Germany. Tonight's film shows his sudden emergence as a patriot in 1940, his ill-starred career as a producer at the BBC, and later as a columnist on Tribune. The film closes with the end of the war and the writing of Orwell's masterpiece Animal Farm. with Douglas Cleverdon , Lettice Cooper , Tosco Fyvel, Anthony Powell and Malcolm Muggeridge

3

George Orwell Part 5: Nineteen Eighty-four

'I do not believe that the kind of society I describe necessarily will arrive, but I believe that something resembling it could arrive. The scene of the book is laid in Britain in order to emphasise that the English-speaking races are not innately better than anyone else and that totalitarianism if not fought against could triumph anywhere.' The last in this series of Arena films about the life and work of George Orwell begins with the tragic death of his wife Eileen in March 1945. Overcome with grief at his bereavement and despair at the future of Britain under the post-war Labour government, Orwell retreated to the remote Hebridean island of Jura. It was here, crippled with tuberculosis and isolated from the rest of the world, that Orwell cared for his adopted infant son, Richard, and wrote his last novel Nineteen Eighty-four-a nightmare vision of a totalitarian future in which Big Brother controls not only the lives but also the thoughts of his citizens, and love and individual freedom is no more than a distant memory. Among those appearing are Avril Dunn Bill Dunn Susan Watson Sonia Orwell and Richard Blair

4

Say Amen Someone

Tonight's Arena Special tells the extraordinary story of two of the legendary figures of American 'gospel' -the music whose emotional impact and burning conviction lie at the heart of much of today's popular music. Thomas A. Dorsey , 'father' and virtual inventor of gospel music, haunted the sinful world of the blues singers as 'Georgia Tom', before turning his music over to God in the early 1920s. In doing so, he remarks, '... I was thrown out of some of the best churches'. Willie Mae Ford Smith suffered similar setbacks, both as a woman evangelist in a predominantly male world and from those who considered her music too spirited to be truly religious. '... You make us sick with that stuff - you might as well be Bessie Smith or one of those Smith sisters!' Tonight's film features some astonishing scenes of gospel revivalism in 'Mother' Smith's Antioch Baptist Church, while the Massed Gospel Choirs Convention honours 84-year-old 'Doctor' Dorsey who crowns the proceedings with an impassioned reading of his classic song 'Precious Lord take my hand'.

5

Dame Edna Everage-A Birthday Tribute

At 10.5 precisely on 17 February 19**, that grande-dame of Antipodean culture, Edna May Everage, drew her first breath in the modest suburb of Moonee Ponds. On Arena tonight, live by satellite from Sydney, Australia, cultural attache Sir Les Patterson salutes a megastar of the entertainment firmament. On this auspicious day - a day which is rumoured, incidentally, to coincide with the 50th birthday of reclusive impresario Barry Humphries-Sir Les introduces precious fragments from the BBC archive which relive the agony and the ecstasy of 'La Dame aux Gladiolas'. Narration David Dimbleby

6

Four Rooms

NTHONY CARO: 'I wanted to play games with our sense of space ... you experience this room with the eyes and the body too.' HOWARD HODGKIN: 'I tried to evoke a sense of romantic luxury. Sadly in a public place nothing very exciting is meant to go on.' RICHARD HAMILTON : 'I took the idea of a room in an institution as a way of looking at the times we live in.' MARC CHAIMOWICZ: 'There are hints of a liaison between two people, like a frozen frame from a film.' Four leading contemporary artists take on an unusual and imaginative commission, to design and build a room of their own.

6

Four Rooms

NTHONY CARO: 'I wanted to play games with our sense of space ... you experience this room with the eyes and the body too.' HOWARD HODGKIN: 'I tried to evoke a sense of romantic luxury. Sadly in a public place nothing very exciting is meant to go on.' RICHARD HAMILTON : 'I took the idea of a room in an institution as a way of looking at the times we live in.' MARC CHAIMOWICZ: 'There are hints of a liaison between two people, like a frozen frame from a film.' Four leading contemporary artists take on an unusual and imaginative commission, to design and build a room of their own.

6

Four Rooms

NTHONY CARO: 'I wanted to play games with our sense of space ... you experience this room with the eyes and the body too.' HOWARD HODGKIN: 'I tried to evoke a sense of romantic luxury. Sadly in a public place nothing very exciting is meant to go on.' RICHARD HAMILTON : 'I took the idea of a room in an institution as a way of looking at the times we live in.' MARC CHAIMOWICZ: 'There are hints of a liaison between two people, like a frozen frame from a film.' Four leading contemporary artists take on an unusual and imaginative commission, to design and build a room of their own.

7

The Theatre of Dario Fo

Playwright, actor, clown, teacher and philosopher, he is an international celebrity with two West-End smash hits to his credit - Can Pay? Won't Pay! and Accidental Death of an Anarchist. He is also a passionate collector of theatre history and a great hero of the Italian Left. Arena filmed DARIO FO against the background of medieval Italy, working with students in Umbria, at home in Milan and against the colourful backdrop of the Venice Carnival, where he performed his triumphant one-man comic show, Mistero Buffo.

8

Sunset People

Tonight Arena takes a journey down one of the best known streets in the world. Sunset Boulevard stretches 27 miles from Los Angeles' Chinatown all the way to the ocean, a ride made famous by Philip Marlowe in the Chandler books. Film star mansions give way to tatty motels; exclusive offices stand alongside nightclubs with aspiring comics and amateur nude contests. Then the famous 'strip' and Hollywood's legendary coffee shop, Schwabs, where, they say, a girl in a tight sweater turned into Lana Turner. Meet some of Sunset's most colourful and improbable residents - the failed showbiz impresario who made his millions selling cookies and the high-rise developer who let John Wayne take his cow up in the lift.... the lucky ones have achieved a peculiarly Hollywood brand of success, but every day on Sunset you meet the other ones - still looking for a break, for a job, for a deal. All of them still trying to play their part in the Hollywood dream.

9

The Caravaggio Conspiracy

On 29 June 1982 a man called John Blake appeared mysteriously bidding in the major auction houses of London and New York. He was in reality the Sunday Times journalist, Peter Watson. The Caravaggio Conspiracy is a true story of a remarkable collaboration between dealers, auction houses and the law to transform Peter Watson , an ignorant outsider, into an international art dealer. Tonight Arena, with the help of the participants, traces the story of how Watson, with a fake limp straight from the pages of a thriller, and a potted knowledge from books of art history, conned his way into a world of mafiosi and art dealers and recovered two masterpieces of stolen Renaissance art.

10

Between Dreaming and Waking

David Inshaw belongs to a great tradition of English Romantic Painting - the tradition of Stanley Spencer , Samuel Palmer and the Fre-Raphelites. His most famous painting 'The Badminton Game' now hangs in the Tate Gallery. For years he was a member of the Brotherhood of Ruralists, a group of painters, among them Peter Blake , preoccupied with English pastoral themes. But Inshaw s pictures tell their own story - of people, places and objects meticulously and magically recalled. Abandoning conventional interviews and commentary, tonight's film offers a journey into David Inshaw 's haunting, imaginative world.

11

Ken Russell 's Elgar

Tonight, in the anniversary year of Edward Elgar 's death, Arena plays host to KEN RUSSELL 'S classic music documentary. Made in 1962 for the 100th edition of the arts magazine Monitor, it marked the arrival of the dramatised arts documentary and proved to be one of the most popular television films ever made. An unashamedly romantic evocation of the composer's life and inspiration in the Malvern Hills, the film nevertheless foreshadowed Russell's later, more contentious, work with his darkly ironic counterpoint of 'Land of hope and glory' with the battle scenes and graveyards of the First World War. Narrated by Huw Wheldon

12

Jerry Lee Lewis

For the first time on British television, Arena presents a concert by this great legend ot rock n roll. Jerry Lee Lewis doesn't sound like anybody else -the voice, the piano and the on-stage antics make an unforgettable combination. He plays and sings today exactly as he did when he made his first records, and as a special bonus the concert is preceded by rare footage of him performing 'Whole lotta shakin" in 1957. Since then he has kept his reputation for wildness, eccentricity and the ability to hold an audience spellbound. Last May Arena's cameras captured him in top form.

13

True Confessions of an Albino Terrorist

Breyten Breytenbach writes about being an Afrikaner. His poetry was taught in schools and his paintings greatly admired. But in 1975 Breytenbach, living in self-imposed exile in Paris with his Vietnamese wife Yolande - their marriage was regarded as 'fornication' under South African law - decided to return to his native country under a false passport, with the intention of recruiting workers against the Government and its policy of apartheid. Breytenbach was betrayed, arrested and sentenced to nine years. This year, two versions of his horrific experience of South African jails are to be published - Mouroir, a surreal account of his life in prison and True Confessions of an Albino Terrorist. Tonight Arena presents the story of this extraordinary man including some of the poetry and paintings completed in prison and smuggled out of South Africa.

14

My Dinner with Louis

Tonight Arena profiles the French film director Louis Malle. Malle is a director who has never let himself be tied down to one style of film making. The Lovers, with Jeanne Moreau , shocked the conservative public in 1958 and his Indian documentaries were candid enough to concern the Indian government. Even in the permissive 70s, Malle found ways to provoke, depicting child prostitution in Pretty Baby with Brooke Shields , and corruption in Lacombe Lucien , about a collaborator in wartime France. Wallace Shawn, the American playwright and actor, first worked with Louis Malle in Atlantic City, USA. They became friends and Malle directed a film that Shawn had written called My Dinner with Andre. Arena took LOUIS MALLE and WALLACE SHAWN back to Atlantic City.

15

Milan Kundera - Laughter and Forgetting

' ... the first step in liquidating a people is to erase its memory. Destroy its books, its culture, its history.... before long the nation will begin to forget what it is and what it was. The world around it will forget even faster.' From the vantage point of his Paris flat, the Czech writer Milan Kundera still obsessively contemplates Prague, the city he was forced to leave nine years ago when, silenced by the pro-Soviet government, his continued life there finally became impossible. Prague has continued to be the setting for all of Kundera's writing. The Book of Laughter and Forgetting brought him to a wide international readership and was compared favourably with Gogol and Kafka. The New York Times wrote: 'It is impossible in this space to do justice to a masterwork. Kundera makes music out of history.' His new book The Unbearable Lightness of Being has been eagerly awaited and on the occasion of its publication Arena talks to Kundera in Paris and seeks reactions to his work from George Theiner , Karol Kyncl , Ian McEwan and Edward Goldstucker

16

A Tribute to Joseph Losey

American-born writer and director Joseph Losey died last month in London. He made his home in England in 1952 when he was hounded out of America after the Communist witch-hunt. Tonight Dirk Bogarde , star of The Servant, who first worked with him 30 years ago, remembers Losey and his distinguished career. Production ROSEMARY WILTON An Arena presentation followed by The Servant starring Dirk Bogarde James Fox , Sarah Miles In this highly acclaimed film of the 60s Joseph Losey successfully collaborated with playwright Harold Pinter and actor Dirk Bogarde. Tony, a rich young man, takes on a manservant, Barrett, to run his Chelsea home. Barrett seizes the opportunity to turn Tony's Georgian ruin into an elegant home. And gradually the relationship between master and servant begins to change ...

17

Beat This! A Hip Hop History

Tonight Arena presents a musical entertainment set in the streets of New York City, an epic rap which will tap the roots of Hip Hop.... the true story of the most influential popular music culture since punk. Gary 'The Crown' Byrd raps us through the elements of Hip Hop - breakdancing, body-popping, graffiti art, rapping and scratching-and introduces us to its heroes. We meet Cool Hero, its legendary first DJ; the head-spinning breakdancing Dynamic Rockers; romeo rappers the Cold Crush Brothers and white funksters Malcolm McLaren and Mel Brooks. And we take the 'A' Train to Planet Rock-the devastated homeland of Hip Hop , better known as New York's South Bronx-to meet the 'Godfather' himself, Afrika Bambaataa whose wild youth as a member of the notorious Black Spades gang, led him to forsake violence for music and dance and found a new and powerful New York tribe called the Zulu Nation.

18

The Everly Brothers: Songs of Innocence and Experience

The first of two films about great names of American popular music. Tonight, the Everly Brothers, whose hits like 'Cathy's clown', 'Bye bye love' and 'Wake up little Susie' defined a generation. Yet their formidable succession of bestsellers had its origins deep in the musical traditions of rural America. Taught to sing from their earliest years, the brothers were raised in a unique cross-current of musical influences, from Appalachian harmony duos to black country blues singers. Their father Ike was an influential guitar picker and hosted the Everly Family Radio Show in the Mid West in the 40s and 50s. It was here that Don and Phil made their public debut. Arena retraces the Everlys' journey, from guitar picking in Kentucky with Ike's friend

19

Billie Holiday: The Long Night of Lady Day

Tonight Arena presents the first film portrait of the greatest of all the jazz singers. Billie Holiday's tragic story, from her traumatic childhood in Baltimore to her premature death in a New York hospital at the age of 44, is told in the words of her closest friends and colleagues - but mostly through the songs themselves. Arena has assembled an unprecedented number of her filmed performances. Songs, including 'God bless the child', 'Don't explain' and 'Fine and mellow', are performed with the legendary names of jazz's golden age - among them Lester Young , Louis Armstrong , Coleman Hawkins and Duke Ellington. With Carmen McRae , Artie Shaw , John Hammond , Leonard Feather Norman Granz and Alice Vrbsky , Lady Day's maid and confidante of her last years.

20

Eubie Blake

The legendary Eubie Blake 's career as a ragtime pianist and composer began in 1883. Sadly last year, five days after his 100th birthday he died. This short tribute includes one of the earliest talkies, Eubie's classic 'I'm just wild about Harry' and a visit to singer Alberta Hunter.

21

Francis Bacon

To mark his 75th birthday, Arena presents this exclusive film portrait of the great British painter, Francis Bacon. Despite his world-wide fame, Bacon remains one of the most contentious painters working today, and he still paints the human figure with the same conviction and intensity that startled the art world at his first exhibition nearly 40 years ago. Tonight, amid the spectacular disorder of his Chelsea studio, Bacon talks on film with great candour, to his friend of many years, the distinguished writer and critic David Sylvester.

22

We Don't Like Your House Either!

This week: a portrait of one of the most individual architectural talents America has produced. Bruce Goff discovered his vocation as a child in Tulsa, Oklahoma, drawing cathedrals and palaces on scraps of paper, and the innocence of those early visionary sketches is evident in all his later work-from the cathedral in Tulsa he designed at the age of 22 to his extraordinary domestic monuments built for the American householder. A friend and disciple of Frank Lloyd Wright , Goff continued to pioneer well into his 70s. Arena went with him to his native midwest to see some of his astonishingly varied and inventive commissions.

23

Teacher Don't Teach Me: Nonsense - The Music of Fela Kuti

Fela Anikulapo-Kuti is the most popular and controversial musician ever to come out of Africa. Born in Nigeria 47 years ago, he has dominated the African musical scene since the early 70s with his unique fusion of traditional rhythm and jazz melodies known as Afro-Beat. Fela's music speaks of the conflict between the European colonial heritage and the traditional African past and cries out forcefully against corruption, exploitation and cultural betrayal. This programme interweaves Fela's music with the story of his struggle against the Nigerian authorities to retain his position as the musical conscience of independent Africa.

24

After the Rehearsal

Arena presents the British premiere of Ingmar Bergman 's new film After the Rehearsal. Written and directed by Bergman last year soon after completing Fanny and Alexander, it continues the autobiographical theme. As theatre director Henrik Vogler sits alone on an empty stage after rehearsal Anna, a young actress, suddenly returns to the theatre to talk about her part.... The director is both cynical and affectionate; he is sick and tired of the theatre but still in love with, and fascinated by, his actors. Bergman refers to it as a chamber-work for television, a meditation on life in the theatre and, even more, on what it's like to be old. Earlier this year

25

What's Cuba Playing At?

In the 25th anniversary year of the Revolution, Arena traces the Afro-Spanish roots of Cuba's rich musical history. If, for you, the rumba still means Come Dancing, then it's time you saw the real thing. Meet Enrique Jorrin , creator of the cha-cha-cha; listen to the septet at the Casa de la Trova, Santiago; the jazz of Irakere; the passionate songs of Pablo Milanes , and the evocative music of family groups still carrying on traditions from 100 years ago. Watch exuberant dancing to the music of popular Los Van Van and, in the courtyard of the Folkloric Company, the rumbas -often remarkably similar to breakdancing - whose forms grew out of the sacred rituals and dances of Cuba's unique Afro-Catholic religions.

26

Music of the other Americas

Every November musicians from all over Latin America come to take part in the international music festival at Varadero in Cuba. For five days bands from all the 'other' Americas vie with each other in a virtuoso display of music - music which is, astonishingly, almost unknown in Britain. Last month Arena went to Varadero to capture the event and tonight presents the finest in contemporary Cuban and Latin American music. With Irakere and Arturo Sandoval ; Los Van Van, Cuba's most popular dance band; soul calypso by Dimension Costena from Nicaragua; and bands from Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Mexico and Uruguay. An Arena production in association with CUBAN TELEVISION

27

Pavarotti at Madison Square Garden

For many Luciano Pavarotti is the world's greatest tenor - certainly his place is assured among the legends of Grand Opera. In New York on 16 August, he Performed before 20,000 People at Madison Square Garden; it was an unprecedented step for an opera singer, a spectacular succcess. Along with his favourite arias from grand opera, Pavarotti delighted his audience with popular songs from his native Italy.
Episode Description

1

Sonny Boy Williamson Sings

First transmitted in 1985, Blues Night presents rare footage of the harmonica blues player Sonny Boy Williamson, who gave B.B. King his big break in 1948. ‘He was on the radio doing live performances when I first came to Memphis. He put me on his show to do this one song – a lady saloon-keeper hired me that day and I’ve worked ever since,’ King explained to the Radio Times.

2

B.B. King Speaks

First transmitted in 1985, John Walters talks to B.B. King - aided by his guitar Lucille - about his extraordinary life, from a childhood picking cotton in Mississippi to worldwide stardom.

3

Chicago Blues

First transmitted in 1985, Harley Cokliss’ classic blues documentary includes performances by Muddy Waters, Junior Wells and Buddy Guy, and shows how the tough urban music of Chicago developed out of the original rural blues.

4

Blind John Davis

First transmitted in 1985, the great Chicago broadcaster and journalist Studs Terkel and pianist Blind John Davis meet in a downtown bar to discuss and play the blues. This interview was shot for "Omnibus: Studs Terkel's Chicago" but not shown in the final programme.

5

Blues Medley

First transmitted in 1985, this medley of the blues features Fred McDowell, Thomas 'Georgia Tom' Dorsey, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee. Huddie Ledbetter - better known as 'Lead Belly' - performs 'Pick a Bale of Cotton', and Billie Holiday accompanied by Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster and Roy Eldridge, performs her own composition 'Fine and Mellow'.

6

Big Bill Blues

First transmitted in 1985, hard blues meets film noir as Big Bill Broonzy sings and plays in a Belgian nightclub back in the 1950s.

7

The Strange Case Of Yukio Mishima

BBC2 Arena documentary from 1985, which examines the controversial life and bizarre death of the Japanese author, playwright, actor and patriot, Yukio Mishima, who was nominated three times for the Nobel Prize for literature, and who committed suicide by ritual disembowelment, on 25th November 1970 after attempting a military coup. Using rare archive footage, including film of Mishima giving a final speech just moments before his death, as well as interviews with the author conducted in English, and reminiscences from his former friends and colleagues, including his English born biographer, Henry Scott Stokes, and translator Donald Keene, the film attempts to shed light on what drove him towards his unusual choice of fate.

8

The Real Buddy Holly Story

The definitive story of the "undisputed father of rock music," produced and hosted by former Beatle Paul McCartney.
Episode Description

1

The Life and Times of Don Luis Buñuel

Documentary about the life and work of director Luis Bunuel

8

Kurosawa

Interview with Japanese film director Akira Kurosawa.

9

Louise Brooks

A look at silent cinema's most enigmatic and erotic icon, featuring rare interviews with Louise Brooks herself, filmed shortly before her death.

10

Henry Moore

John Read shares his memories of Henry Moore, whom he filmed six times over 28 years.

11

Salvador Dali

Episode Description

1

Stand By Your Dream (The Tammy Wynette Story)

Stand By Your Dream (The Tammy Wynette Story)

2

Night and Day

A 24 hour journey through the streets of London as seen by two writers. Spectator columnist Jeffrey Bernard explores the daylight hours, with thriler writer Celia Fremlin walking the hours of darkness.

3

Dennis Potter

Alan Yentob interviews TV dramatist Dennis Potter about his work through the years, touching on subjects such as why and how he started writing, his sense of being different as a child, the insularity of his past in Forest of Dean, starting at the BBC in 1959 and a failed attempt at going into politics.

4

Martin Chambi and the Heirs of the Incas

Story of photographer Martin Chambi, a Peruvian Indian whose photographs of the Inca ruins and Peruvian society brought him to the forefront of revolutionary artistic and social movements in South America in the 1930's.

5

Confessions of Robert Crumb

Robert Crumb discusses his life and his work.

6

Ruth, Roses and Revolver

Director David Lynch presents a guide to the work of the Surrealists.

7

A Brother With Perfect Timing

Documentary on jazz musician Abdullah Ibrahim, a South African who moved to Amer ica in 1965. His music uses a blend of jazz and the traditional styles of South Africa.

8

Andrei Tarkovsky's Cinema

Beyond the edges of the frame influential filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky give the viewers a sense of time passing, time lost, and the relationship of one moment in time to another.

9

Putting Ourselves In The Picture

Report on the work of photographer Jo Spence, and how she has developed 'phototheraphy', a means of self help following the discovery in 1982 that she had breast cancer, but refused the usual medical treatments

10

How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria?

Maria Von Trapp, Bob Guccione, Martin Scorsese, Mary O'Hara, Tony Monopoly and o thers talk about their training to become Roman Catholic monks, priests or nuns, and also discuss the similarity between the church and the world of arts and entertainment.

11

Bayan Ko Pilipinas

Philippines film director Lino Brocka led a clandestine expedition into the moun tains, accompanied by ARENA, to film interviews with the New People's Army of th e Philippines.

12

Talk Is Cheap

Discourse on the art of the chat show

13

Night Moves

Documentary on the personalities and machines of the trucking industry in Great Britain.

14

The Waugh Trilogy Part 1: Bright Young Thing

Three part pfofile of writer Evelyn Waugh. Covers the period of his early life with comments from Sir Harold Acton, Lady Diana Mosley, Anthony Powell, Peter Quennell and Graham Greene.

15

The Waugh Trilogy Part 2: Mayfair And The Jungle

The most productive years of Waugh's writings. With comments from John Mortimer, Kingsley Amis, and Graham Greene.

16

The Waugh Trilogy Part 3: An Englishman's Home

Television Extracts Face to Face Monitor

17

Joseph Beuys

Documentary tracing the career of controversial German artist Joseph Beuys, from World War II up to his death in 1986.

18

Revolutionary With A Paintbox

A profile of Diego Rivera. The portrait compiles testimony from Mexican novelist Carlos Fuentes, ex-model and lover Bolores Olmedo and painter Jose Luis Cuevas. There is archive footage of Zapata, Trotsky and Rivera himself.

19

Your Honour, I Object! Guccione V Russell

A courtroom 'drama' featuring Bob Guccione versus Ken Russell in a breach of con tract case regarding disagreements over a script for a film version of Daniel De foe's "Moll Flanders" which Guccione hired Russell to direct.

20

Invisible Ink

Documentary on the writings of Indians who travelled to Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries and wrote about their experiences.

21

Art Spiegelman: Of Cats and Mice

Following the publication of his book 'Maus', a comic strip depicting cats and mice in the story of a young Jewish couple arrested and transported to Auschwitz, its creator comic-strip artist, Art Spiegelmann and his family, travel to Auschwitz for the first time.
Episode Description

1

Woody Guthrie

Woody Guthrie was born into a family made rich by the Oklahoma oil boom. But by the time he was eight years old, his mother was in an insane asylum and his father had lost every penny. His personal life was a catalogue of tragedy and disease, yet he had a vision that inspired two generations of Americans. The dustiest of the Dust Bowlers, Guthrie made his own life into a myth. He appointed himself spokesman for the poor and oppressed and through his songs turned their life into his own. This classic film is full of the songs of Woody Guthrie and contains rare footage of him performing. Guthrie's story is told in his own words and includes extended interviews with friends and family.

2

The Dandy-Beano Story

Arena presents, on the occasion of their 50th anniversaries, a tribute to those great British institutions, the Beano and the Dandy. In their pages, the Softie has fought an unending losing battle against the likes of Dennis the Menace and Minnie the Minx, and the cow pie and the slap-up feed remain the just rewards for good behaviour. Arena visits Dundee in Scotland, where the current editors give their rendition of 'The Lost Highway' to the strumming of the Beano guitar. The film also includes such stalwart fans as the acerbic Steve Bell on the sources of his inspiration, Joan Armatrading, who not only wrote a song about the Beano but actually guest-starred in a strip, and leading young fogey A. N. Wilson on his admiration for Desperate Dan.

3

Broadway - The Great White Way

A voyage down the 146 miles of New York's Broadway, exploring the legends of the 'Great White Way'. Allen Ginsberg, George `Mr Broadway' Abbott, Indian Chief Lone Bear, Lena Horne, Ben E. King and Rip Van Winkle contribute.

4

Ryszard Kapuscinski : Your Man Who Is There

On the work of Ryszard Kapuscinski, a major figure in contemporary literature an d journalism. In three decades he has witnessed and reported on 27 revolutions, and is now working on a trilogy on 20th century despotism - 'Amin'.

5

The Emperor

Performance of Jonathan Miller's production for the Royal Court Theatre, of Ryszard Kapuscinski's "The Emperor", adapted for the stage and television by Michael Hastings and Jonathan Miller. Drama about the last days of Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia before his final overthrow.

6

My Name Is Celia Cruz

Profile of Cuban salsa singer Celia Cruz, who now lives and works in New York.

7

An Andalucian Journey

A journey through southern Spain to meet the Andalucian gypsy families who keep alive the traditions of flamenco.

8

Robert Mapplethorpe

Profile of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, to accompany the exhibition of his work at the National Portrait Gallery.

9

The English Thoroughbred

Documentary on the thoroughbred horse. Horses include Oh So Sharp, Dancing Brave, Adjal and Reference Point.

10

Byrne About Byrne

John Byrne, author of TUTTI FRUTTI, writes and directs his own film autobiography.

11

Ten Green Bottles

Tenth anniversary edition of the programme, featuring clips from some of the pro grammes of the last ten years.

12

Clint Eastwood

Interview with Clint Eastwood about his career, his work as a director and the evolution of the Eastwood persona.

13

Moving Across The World On Horses

Documentary about the work of Michael Ondaatje, including a dramatisation of his ideas.

14

History Boys On The Rampage

Report about the Field Day Theatre Company's production of Making History on tour in Northern Ireland.

15

The Unforgettable Nat King Cole

Portrait of American singer Nat King Cole, from his birthplace in Alabama through his early career as a young jazz pianist in Chicago to world famous vocalist.
Episode Description

1

Tales of Barcelona

DOCUMENTARY. Film-maker Jana Bokova's personal portrait of the city and people of Barcelona. Features fashion designer Tony Miro, Tito who makes giant sculptures out of human hair, Carmen de Roca Sastre, performance artist Albert Vidal, futuristic designer Louis Fortes, transvestites Emmy and Liberty, gallery owner Fernando Amat, and the architectural works...

2

Blackpool

1989 documentary which takes a look at Europe's most successful holiday resort, famous for its Tower, illuminations, landladies and party political conferences. Includes interviews with Norman Tebbit, John Cole, Paul Theroux and Tony Benn.

3

The Tip of the Iceberg

Documentary on the representation of the female breast in Arts and the Media. Looking at the ways in which the bosom is idealised and the means by which it is trivialised and denigrated. Women talk about how they react and cope with breast cancer 'the tip of the iceberg'.

4

Laurens Van Der Post And Albert Sample

Two films by award-winning director Georg Troller, made for West German televisi on's arts programme PERSONENBESCHREIBUNG, profiling Sir Laurens Van Der Post and his work in drawing attention to the plight of Africa's threatened tribes; and on the Texan criminal Albert Sample.

5

New York - The Secret African City

Report from New York, on the import of African gods, myths and rituals into the city by inhabitants of African descent.

6

Eugene Ionesco: The Joke's On Us

Assessment of the life and work of the dramatist Eugene Ionesco.

7

John Cassavetes

Tribute to actor and director John Cassavetes who died in February 1989. Friends, associates and fellow directors remember the man and his work.

8

Power in the Blood

Documentary on country musician Vernon Oxford who has devoted his life to Jesus and uses his music to bring people to the Lord.

9

The Old Brass Plate Rattle Test - The Englishman And His Jukebox

10

Juke Box Jury

Special edition of the programme to celebrate the centenary of the juke box.

11

Lubetkin Thoughts Of A Twentieth Century Anarchist

Documentary on the life and work of architect Berthold Lubetkin.

12

Heavy Metal

Documentary on heavy metal music, exploring its origins in the blues to the black country and beyond, including in concert clips and interviews with leading heavy metal bands.

13

The Other Graham Greene

For some 25 years Graham Greene has found himself the victim of a bizarre masquerade. A man calling himself Graham Greene has opened hotels, courted high society in the south of France and was entertained by tea planters in India convincd he was the real Graham Greene. But is 'the other' Greene a decoy invented by the secretive Greene to confuse and deceive his chosen biographer Norman Sherry?

14

25 X 5 The Continuing Adventures Of The Rolling Stones

An Arena Special looking at the career, development and success of the band over the past 25 years, and including clips from the Stones' own archives and from the hitherto unseen GREAT ROCK 'N' ROLL CIRCUS of 1969, made in answer to the Beatles' "Magical Mystery Tour". It traces in detail the high and low points of the group over the years and their present continuing success.
Episode Description

1

Numbers

For some numbers promise pattern and certainty. For others, such as Gregory Chaitin, one of the world's three leading mathematicians, nothing is fixed in an ever-shifting universe. An off-the-wall look at numbers.

2

Oblomov

3

Jerry Lee Lewis

4

Rossellini

5

Next Time Dear God Please Choose Someone Else

6

Salif Keita

7

Fred Zinnemann A Director's Life

8

Spike And Company - Do It A Capella

9

Peggy And Her Playwrights

10

The English Rose

11

Paris Is Burning

12

Havana

13

The Princess

14

The Ten Commandments Of Krzysztof Kieslowski

15

Le Paris Black

16

Kino Perestroika

17

The Daily Worker Story

18

Oooh Er, Missus! - The Frankie Howerd Story

19

Agatha Christie - Unfinished Portrait

20

The Last Supper

21

The Complete History Of The Potato

22

I Just Happen To Have One Here I Made Earlier

23

Lifepulse - A Natural Thriller

Episode Description

1

Miller Meets Mandela

2

Derek Jarman A Portrait

3

Anselm Kiefer: Operation Sealion

4

The Very Strange Story Of... The Legendary Joe Meek

5

Mardi Gras

6

Caroline 199 - A Pirate's Tale

Radio Caroline, founded in 1964 by Ronan O'Rahilly, gave many DJs their first break, including Tony Blackburn. Arena traces the origins of this broadcasting phenomenon of the 60s which is threatened with extinction by the government's new bill.

7

Staring At The Ceiling

8

Three Irish Writers

9

One Irish Rover

10

The Importance Of Being Oscar

11

The Other Roci

12

Kenneth Anger's Hollywood Babylon

13

Elmore Leonard's Criminal Records

14

The Human Face

15

Texas Saturday Night

16

The Complete Citizen Kane

An Arena Special looking at Orson Welles and the production of the film CITIZEN KANE, considering the furore that accompanied it and the real life press baron William Randolph Hearst upon whom Kane is based, and his efforts to halt the film, destroy the negative and persecution of people involved with its production and showing. It includes BBC interviews with Welles made in 1960 and 1982, and film historian Robert Carringer looks at the scenes that never made it to the screen. American film critic Pauline Kael also analyses the film's enduring appeal.
Episode Description

1

Perpetual Motion - The Routemaster Bus

Warren Clarke narrates a look at London's world-famous red Routemaster buses which, although designed in the 1950s for a lifespan of just 17 years, was in use into the next century. About Arena

2

Masters Of The Canvas

When pop artist Peter Blake confessed that his fantasy was to be the mysterious masked wrestler Kendo Nagasaki, who never speaks and never removes his mask, little did he know what the consequences would be.

3

Armistead Maupin Is a Man I Dreamt Up

Episode Description

6

A Tribute to Dizzy Gillespie

Profile of the jazz trumpeter, composer and band leader who died earlier this month (January 1993).
Episode Description

8

Glitterbug - Derek Jarman

During the 1970s and 1980s Derek Jarman kept a Super-8 film diary, chronicling the cultural high life and low life of London. The footage ranges from William Burroughs reading aloud at the nightclub Heaven, to candid behind-the-scenes footage of his most controversial feature films including Jubilee and Sebastiane. The original music is written by his long term collaborator Brian Eno. Glitterbug, his last film, was shown as a tribute to Jarman who died on 19 February 1994

9

Philip K. Dick A Day In The Afterlife

Documentary which goes on an imaginative tour from the Colorado grave where Dick is buried to the suburbs of California where he lived and worked. Talks to his ex-wives, friends and biographers.

10

Voices from the Island

Nelson Mandela and his fellow ex-prisoners recall their incarceration on South Africa's Robben Island. For three decades, the island housed not only political prisoners but convicts, lepers and the mentally ill. Yet amidst the hopelessness, Nelson Mandela and his comrades devised strategies and subterfuges with which they transformed life on the island, while the vision of a new South Africa began to take shape.

11

The Ring - A South London Tale

Documentary following Paul Lynch of South London, who takes part in illegal bare-knuckle fights, and is challenged by the `Cyclone', the supposed Northern Ireland bare-knuckle boxing champion. Despite the build-up and apparent animosity between the two men, the `Cyclone' pulls out and the fight never takes place. It further transpires that Lynch, whose previous claim to fame was as the world press-up champion (with a tv appearance on RECORD BREAKERS), has probably engineered the whole circumstances. There never was anyone called the `Cyclone' (one of Lynch's friends in disguise) and all of the supposed footage of bare-knuckle boxing during the programme was staged. Just how much the programme makers were in on the hoax from the beginning is unclear.
Episode Description

1

The Peter Sellers Story Part 1 - From Southsea to Shepperton

The life and time of comedy genius Peter Sellers, told with the help of his extraordinary collections of home movies and featuring interviews with family, friends and colleagues.

2

The Peter Sellers Story Part 2 - From Jack to Jacques

The life and time of comedy genius Peter Sellers, told with the help of his extraordinary collections of home movies and featuring interviews with family, friends and colleagues.

3

The Peter Sellers Story Part 3 - I am Not A Funny Man

The life and time of comedy genius Peter Sellers, told with the help of his extraordinary collections of home movies and featuring interviews with family, friends and colleagues.

4

Punk and the Pistols

Episode Description

2

The Burger & the King: The Life & Cuisine of Elvis Presley

A remarkable guided tour through the culinary world of Elvis Presley, in his later years famed as much for his appetite as for his music. The King's passion for food is recounted by close friends, relatives and personal cooks who share the recipes that kept their idol happy. From the squirrel and racoon dishes of his youth to the fried peanut butter and banana sandwiches that contributed to his demise.
Episode Description

1

Dear Antonioni

Documentary portrait of director Michelangelo Antonioni.
Episode Description

1

The Sir Noel Coward Trilogy Part One: The Boy Actor

This first programme of the trilogy follows Coward's rise from suburban South London boy to the world's highest-paid author at the age of 30. He earned notoriety with his play The Vortex, but by the late Twenties his huge success had driven him to a nervous breakdown.

2

The Sir Noel Coward Trilogy Part Two: Captain Coward

Captain Coward focuses on his journeys to the Far East with Earl Amherst (which inspired famous songs such as Mad Dogs and Englishmen), as well as entertaining the troops during the war years and films In Which We Serve and Brief Encounter.

3

The Sir Noel Coward Trilogy Part Two: Sail Away

Sail Away follows Coward's cabaret triumphs in London and Las Vegas after the Second World War and his years as a tax exile in Switzerland and Jamaica, right up to his death. His long-term partner, the late Graham Payn shows us around Chalet Coward, and archive film reveals the glamorous poolside lifestyle he enjoyed, as well as his late successes: a cameo performance in The Kitchen, and the musical Sail Away as recalled by its star Elaine Stritch.

4

The Brian Epstein Story: The Sun Will Shine Tomorrow

First in a two-part documentary examining the turbulent life and career of Beatles manager Brian Epstein. Gay when homosexuality was illegal, a gambler, shopkeeper and failed actor, he was also pop king with a midas touch who, in the 60s, was as well known as the band he managed.

5

The Brian Epstein Story: Tomorrow Never Knows

Part two of the documentary on Beatles manager Brian Epstein. By the mid 60s, Epstein was lured into the world of gambling, sex and drugs and in 1967 he was found dead in his London mansion at the age of 32.
Episode Description

1

Wisconsin Death Trip

This poetic documentary uses archive newspaper reports, the contemporary photographs of Charles Van Shaick, and reconstructions to portray the mysterious and tragic events that befell the small and unsuspecting American town of Black River Falls in the 1890s. The story was originally told in Michael Lesy's book, which was itself based on newspaper reports and archive photographs from the time. Ian Holm narrates the stories using the words of the local newspaper editor.
Episode Description

1

Sykes and a Day

Writer, performer and director, the late Eric Sykes was the renaissance man of British comedy. This episode of Arena opens the doors of the room that was his creative home for forty years."The minute I come through this door and I close it, then I'm in my world of creation. I can't tell you how many shows or how many films - it's all here, I can feel it, it's almost tangible", he says in the film. Post-war Britain saw Sykes catapulted to fame in the hugely successful Variety Bandbox and Educating Archie. He quickly became the country's highest paid comedy writer. When Spike Milligan was going through a period of stress, Sykes helped him with The Goons, sometimes writing whole episodes and typically eschewing the credit. Later, his television series with Hattie Jacques, Sykes And A... ran for 20 years attracting gigantic audiences. The film takes him through a day at his beloved office, an Aladdin's Cave of triumphs and treasures. There he muses on his life and career, and the other greats he knew and worked with.
Episode Description

1

Harold Pinter - The Room

This edition chronicles Pinter's East End childhood, his work as an actor, the critical appraisal of his work, and his passion for cricket. The film looks at the various rooms in which Pinter formulated his ideas and wrote his early works, and features footage shot at the Almeida Theatre of a recent production of Pinter's first play 'The Room', featuring Lindsay Duncan, Keith Allen, Lia Williams, and Henry Woolf, and which was directed by Pinter himself.

2

Harold Pinter - Celebration

This programme focuses on the relationship between the public and private aspects of Pinter's life and work. The film includes footage from two Pinter stage productions - 'One For The Road' with Pinter himself in the lead role, and 'Celebration', which was directed by Pinter.

3

Radio Ha! It's Time For 'Just a Minute'

Not many can talk for a minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation - but, for 35 years, Just a Minute panellists have done just that. Paul Merton, Clement Freud, Linda Smith and Ross Noble continue the story, with referee Nicholas Parsons forever trying to keep the unruly quartet under control.
Episode Description

1

Buffalo Bill's Wild West: How the Myth Was Made

The western movie, the cowboy novel, the rodeo and the wild west show are all means by which the West has become mythologised, distorted, caricatured and made larger than life. The West no longer lives in reality, only in the world of the imagination, but the key figure in the historical process whereby the factual, historical West was transformed into the 'Western myth' was William Frederick 'Buffalo Bill' Cody. It was within his persona that the raw material of experience was transformed into showbusiness. This documentary tells Buffalo Bill's story, including his life as a Pony Express rider, prairie scout, buffalo hunter and wild west show creator. With rock legend David Johansen as the voice of Buffalo Bill, Arena uses drama and unique archive of the real Buffalo Bill to tell an extraordinary tale with strangely contemporary resonance.

2

The Life and Times of Count Luchino Visconti

Luchino Visconti lives large over the Italian cinema landscape. To be remembered and recognized as a genius in a nation that has produced so many genius filmmakers, a director really has to be at the top of their game all the time. Visconti, the creator of such films as Death in Venice, Ludwig, La Terra Trema, The Leopard, The Damned, and Rocco and His Brothers, rarely put a step wrong, putting some of the most memorable images of Italian cinema to film. But in his private life he led the kind of adventures that, even today, would have seen him branded a heretic in the puritanical USA. An open homosexual, an avowed Communist, and a silver-spoon-fed Aristocrat, his films echoed his life in ways that were rarely complimentary, but always stunning. Just like this documentary.

3

Dylan Thomas - From Grave to Cradle

Episode Description

2

Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus

A stunningly-photographed, thought-provoking road trip into the heart of the poor white American South. Singer Jim White takes his 1970 Chevy Impala through a gritty terrain of churches, prisons, truckstops, biker bars and coalmines. Along the way are roadside encounters with present-day musical mavericks the Handsome Family, David Johansen, David Eugene Edwards of 16 Horsepower and old-time banjo player Lee Sexton, and grisly stories from the cult Southern novelist Harry Crews.

3

Remember the Secret Policeman's Ball?

A celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Secret Policeman's Ball in aid of Amnesty International. Many of Britain's finest comedians, including John Cleese, Sir Bob Geldof, Alan Bennett, Jennifer Saunders, Stephen Fry, Terry Jones, Terry Gilliam, Ruby Wax, Lenny Henry, Sting, Phil Collins and Rowan Atkinson are reunited in a reflection of the changes in British comedy over the last quarter of a century. The film examines the event, with interviews and recollections of the original stars alongside classic comedy moments.

4

Painting the Clouds: a Portrait of Dennis Potter

5

Bergman and Faro Island

A documentary showing Ingmar Bergman on Faro Island. He goes into his childhood as well as ideas found in his works.
Episode Description

3

Arena at 30

Arena at 30 celebrates the hugely influential and award-winning arts documentary series. There are features on Orson Welles, Jean Genet, Francis Bacon and No Direction Home – Bob Dylan, a two-part film about the legendary musician, by Martin Scorsese, which aired on 26 and 27 September 2005 on BBC Two.

4

Lunch with Galton and Simpson

Nigel Williams meets comedy writers Ray Galton and Alan Simpson for lunch as they discuss their career including classics 'Hancock's Half Hour' and 'Steptoe and Son'.
Episode Description

1

Bacon's Arena

The Estate of Francis Bacon and BBC2 Arena co-produced the documentary film Bacon’s Arena, directed by Adam Low. It was broadcast in the UK in March 2005, and has enjoyed wide critical acclaim. The documentary was nominated for the 2005 International Emmy Awards. In 2007 the Estate of Francis Bacon commissioned threehumansinc to produce a DVD version of Bacon’s Arena. The DVD provides an unusually wide perspective of the life and work of a contemporary artist and includes many extra features such as interviews, short films about aspects of Bacon’s life and work not covered in the feature documentary, and an interactive gallery of selected Bacon’s paintings.
Episode Description

1

The Other Side of the Mirror - Bob Dylan at the Newport Folk Festival

Murray Lerner's documentary features Bob Dylan's performances at the Newport folk festival between 1963 and 1965 - the time when Dylan changed the music of the world and changed himself from the fresh-faced cherub singing Blowin' in the Wind to the rock 'n' roll shaman who blew pop music apart when he went electric. The film No Direction Home told the story of how Dylan affected the world and the world affected Dylan, but this film brings you face to face with the work itself. Like the discovery of a hitherto unknown manuscript or an unseen masterpiece, this is a treasure trove, newly opened up.

2

Ken Dodd's Happiness

Comedian Ken Dodd turned 80 in 2007. Armed with his tickling sticks, stand-up routines and songs he continues to delight his devoted audiences all over the country with his Happiness show. Arena's exploration of Britain's most enduring variety entertainer reveals his personal analysis of humour and illustrates why Ken Dodd is acknowledged as one of the finest exponents of his comic craft.

3

Shadowing The Third Man

The fractured state of Europe after World War II was perfectly captured in Carol Reed's thriller The Third Man. Set in Vienna and with Orson Welles starring unforgettably as the mysterious Harry Lime, it showcased some of Graham Greene's finest screenwriting. With unlimited access to the original movie, Arena explores the filmmaking artistry, moral world and furious infighting behind the film.

4

Underground

The Tube is the world's oldest underground railway system, with its own unwritten rules of behaviour and protocol. This Arena begins 150 years ago in a Victorian London of slums and gaslight, and takes the viewer on a thrilling and mysterious adventure through Tube history. Using the voices of passengers and Tube staff, the programme is nothing less than a celebration of a parallel universe, underground. The film has been produced for Arena by Lone Star productions in association with London's Transport Museum.

5

The Comic Strip Hero

A look at the legend of 'Superman' and its portrayal in comic books and films.

6

Bob Marley: Exodus

Marley's legendary concert at the Rainbow in the summer of 1977 took reggae music and the message of Rastafaria to a world that hitherto had been exposed to neither. The programme is a visual evocation of the world of 1977, a world that seems very far away now, and of the spirit of Marley's most significant album.

7

Flames of Passion: The Other Side of British Cinema

From the Second World War to the early 1960s, British movies were hugely popular with British audiences. Yet leaving aside an acknowledged classic or two, the mainstream films of these years have been dismissed by filmmakers and critics as unexciting and unremarkable, emotionally dead and lacking any sense of true cinematic flair. The French director Francois Truffaut suggested that "there is a certain incompatibility between the terms cinema and Britain", and Pauline Kael, America's most famous critic, reflected that "British cinema has always been a sad joke". With a wealth of vibrant extracts from forgotten and over-looked movies, Flames of Passion celebrates the British cinema of the 1940s and 1950s. The melodramas, crime films and horror shockers of these years, almost all of which were derided by contemporary critics, reveal a flamboyant, sometimes spectacular, poetic, perverse, and surprisingly sexy cinema. Yet this is also a cinema of great feeling and emotional complexity, dealing with the difficulties and occasional traumas of women and men as they come to terms with the post-war world. And it is a cinema that is centrally and compellingly about Britain and the British, about our ideas of who we were and who we are. Flames of Passion, produced for BBC2's Arena strand, is a film created entirely from film extracts and stills. Among the key films featured are the mystical wartime story A Canterbury Tale (1944), the noir classic They Made Me a Fugitive (1947), the bizarre melodrama Madonna of the Seven Moons (1944), the taut kidnap drama Obsession (1948) and the gritty, edgy Hell Drivers (1957).

8

The Archers 15,000th Episode

Stephen Fry narrates a documentary which goes behind the scenes at The Archers and follows the production team as they put together the 15,000th episode of the world's longest-running radio soap. They plot, write and record the thrilling climax to the story that hit the headlines in November 2006 - the love triangle between David Archer, his wife Ruth, and herdsman Sam. With extracts from episodes dating back over its history and interviews with actors, editors, writers and fans, the film delves into the nooks and crannies of The Archers and examines the enduring appeal of this hugely popular agricultural soap.

9

Into the Limelight

A documentary looking at the tribute bands who play at and the life that revolves the Limelight Club in a converted Methodist church in Crewe in the north west of England.

10

Radio Ha! It's Time for Just a Minute

Not many can talk for a minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation - but, for 35 years, Just a Minute panellists have done just that. Paul Merton, Clement Freud, Linda Smith and Ross Noble continue the story, with referee Nicholas Parsons forever trying to keep the unruly quartet under control.

11

Encountering Bergman

A profile of the famous Swedish film director Ingmar Bergman through the eyes of three people who interviewed him: Melvyn Bragg, Olivier Assayas & Marie Nyreröd. Narrated by Dilly Barlow.
Episode Description

1

Strange Luck Of V.S. Naipaul

Profile of the Nobel Prize-winning Trinidadian-born British writer, VS Naipaul. Filmed in India, Trinidad and his Wiltshire home, Naipaul remains as incisive, forthright and controversial as ever at the age of 75.

2

Routemasters! The Double Decker Bus Conductors

Documentary celebrating one of London's great characters, the bus conductor. The film tells the stories of five extraordinary conductors from five decades of London's history, rich with period music and archive.

3

Cab Driver

Arts documentary series. The story of five London taxi drivers, recalling their experiences going back 70 years.

4

The Hunt for Moby Dick

Acclaimed writer Philip Hoare confronts our fascination with one of the most mysterious animals in the ocean, the whale. Travelling in the footsteps of Ishmael, the narrator of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick, the great American novel, he visits the whaling ports of New England. New Bedford was once the richest city in the USA, and the island of Nantucket is where the whaling industry began. Hoare searches for the truth behind the story of Moby-Dick and draws an eerie parallel between Captain Ahab's crazed pursuit of the great white whale and today's war on terror. He enters a world haunted by a bloody and violent past, and, in the three mile-deep waters of the Atlantic, has his own encounter with the legendary sperm whale.

5

The Agony And Ecstasy Of Phil Spector

Arts documentary series. Interview with music producer Phil Spector, looking back over a 50-year career.

6

Paul Scofield

Arts documentary series. Leading theatrical greats, including Peter Brook, Vanessa Redgrave and John Hurt, pay tribute to the outstanding British actor Paul Scofield.

7

Voices from the Island

Nelson Mandela and his fellow ex-prisoners recall their incarceration on South Africa's Robben Island. For three decades, the Island housed not only political prisoners but convicts, lepers and the mentally ill. Yet amidst the hopelessness, Nelson Mandela and his comrades devised strategies and subterfuges with which they transformed life on the Island, while the vision of a new South Africa began to take shape.

8

The Whale in the Museum

Documentary telling the story of the construction of the much-loved blue whale at the Natural History Museum. As the world marched towards war in 1938, a determined group of men at the museum undertook the unprecedented task of building a life-sized model of the largest creature that has ever lived.
Episode Description

6

Cool

Documentary exploring the meaning and history of cool through the American music of the 1940s and 50s that became known as cool jazz. Those who wrote and played it cultivated an attitude, a style and a language that came to epitomise the meaning of a word that is now so liberally used. The film tells the story of a movement that started in the bars and clubs of New York and Los Angeles and swept across the world, introducing the key players and setting them in the context of the post-war world.

7

T.S. Eliot

For the first time on television, Arena tells the whole story of the life and work of TS Eliot including the happiness he found in the last years of life in his second marriage. His widow Valerie Eliot has opened her personal archive, hitherto unseen, including the private scrapbooks and albums in which Eliot assiduously recorded their life together. Arena brings an unprecedented insight into the mysterious life of one of the 20th century's greatest poets, and re-examines his extraordinary work and its startling immediacy in the world today. Thomas Stearns Eliot materialises as banker, critic, playwright, children's writer, churchwarden, publisher, husband and poet. Contributors include Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney, Lady Spender, Jeanette Winterson, Christopher Ricks and Andrew Lloyd-Webber.
Episode Description

1

Brian Eno - Another Green World

Brian Eno first starred as the feather-crested electronic keyboard genius of Roxy Music forty years ago. Since then he has been hailed as a pioneer, with his revolutionary experiments in ambient music and audio visual art and as featured producer on benchmark albums by David Bowie, Talking Heads, U2 and Coldplay. Eno has given Arena unprecedented access to observe him working in his studio and talking with friends and colleagues. The master of reinvention engages with fellow influential minds, including Richard Dawkins, Malcolm Gladwell, David Whittaker and Steve Lillywhite, in a series of conversations on science, art, systems analysis, producing and cybernetics

2

Dave Brubeck - In His Own Sweet Way

Three young men who emerged in the 1950s - Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Dave Brubeck - not only captured the public's imagination, but in their own unique way determined the evolution of jazz as we know it today. Of this triumvirate, only Dave Brubeck remains. As he approaches his 90th birthday in December 2010, he is set to play New York's legendary Blue Note jazz club. This Clint Eastwood co-produced documentary tells Brubeck's personal story, tracing his career from his first musical experiences to the overwhelming success of the Dave Brubeck Quartet and the iconic status he and his varied forms of musical expression have achieved. It is told with contemporary interviews, vintage performances, previously unseen archive and additional performances filmed especially for the documentary. The story is also told by Dave and Iola Brubeck, both in their own words and by musical example. Contributors include Bill Cosby, Jamie Cullum, Yo-Yo Ma, George Lucas and Eastwood himself. In 2009 Brubeck was awarded the Kennedy Center Honors, with Robert De Niro, Bruce Springsteen, Grace Bumbry and Mel Brooks. He played with his sons for President Obama at the White House, and 55 years ago became the first jazz musician to appear on the cover of Time magazine. His classic Take Five is as familiar today as in 1959 when it was a Top 10 hit all over the world. Brubeck has an unlikely origin for a jazz giant, growing up on a ranch in Monterey, California. Monterey resident Clint Eastwood introduced Brubeck and his Cannery Row Suite at the 2006 Monterey Jazz Festival and each were so inspired by the success of the event they agreed to move forward with this full-length documentary together.

3

My Name is Celia Cruz

The queen of salsa, Celia Cruz has been the most adored and dynamic singer in Latin America for more than four decades. Since she left Cuba at the time of the 1959 revolution with her band Sonora Matancera, she lived in New York and rose to international fame with the legendary Latin bands of Tito Puente and Johnny Pacheco, the creators of salsa. This profile includes testimony from friends, fans, fellow professionals and a stunning performance at New York's world-famous Apollo Theatre.

4

Frank Sinatra - The Voice of the Century

Acknowledged as one of the greatest singers of the twentieth century, Arena explores the rise of legendary, Rat Pack crooner from his early family background to overwhelming show business success. Interviews with friends, family and associates reveal a star studded career in music and film alongside a fascinating private life of four marriages, liaison with the Kennedy family, Las Vegas business interests and an alleged association with the Mafia.

5

Harold Pinter: A Celebration

6

Hank Williams - Honky Tonk Blues

Hank Williams was the greatest singer-songwriter country music has ever known. He died on a journey half-way across America to a gig he would never make, at the age of just 29. More than fifty years after his death, Williams ranks among the most powerfully iconic figures in American music. He set the agenda for contemporary country songcraft and sang his songs with such believability that we feel privy to his world, despite the fact that he left no in-depth interviews and just a few letters. His brief life and tragic death have only compounded his appeal. With his seductive musings on love and ruin, Williams didn't just embody the honky tonk ethos, he practically invented it. Dirt-poor and rail-thin, he blazed out of Alabama in the late 1940s with the go-for-broke fervour of a man whose days were numbered. The emotional clarity of his voice spoke to millions, and by the age of 25 he was country music's first superstar. Four years later, overtaken by his own heart, he was gone - an icon to the world and an enigma to those who thought they knew him best. With the help of his family and closest friends, this film sets out to find the real Hank Williams.
Episode Description

1

Produced by George Martin

Profile of record producer Sir George Martin. He began with Nellie the Elephant, 633 Squadron and Peter Sellers, then came The Beatles and then the golden age of rock. Martin recorded the soundtrack of the second half of the 20th century. This rich and intimate portrait follows Sir George at 85 with his wife Judy, son Giles, Sir Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Cilla Black, Michael Palin, Rolf Harris and Bernard Cribbins among the many contributors.

2

Bob Dylan: No Direction Home - Part 1

A story told in flashbacks, Martin Scorsese's documentary intertwines the immediacy of Bob Dylan's controversial 1966 tour of the British Isles with his remarkable personal and musical journey. Drawing from hundreds of hours of unseen footage and rare recordings, in-depth interviews and revealing photographs, the film strikes a remarkable balance - telling the story of one man's journey and at the same time placing that story within the greater canvas of human events. This opening part traces his journey from a rock 'n' roll loving kid in the Midwest to his arrival as a major force in the world of folk music. In his own words, Dylan tells viewers how he became smitten with folk music as the story shifts scenes from the iron range in Minnesota to Greenwich Village in New York City. An amazing cast of characters includes Dave Van Ronk, the king of Greenwich village folk clubs, Joan Baez, queen of the folk music world and Allen Ginsburg, America's beat poet laureate. And, most importantly, the wide range of music that influenced the young Bob Dylan is explored. As Dylan's fame and notoriety grows, his skill as a performer matures rapidly and the songs begin to pour out - Blowing in the Wind, A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall, Masters of War, Don't Think Twice It's Alright and many more. Part one ends with what seems to be the dawn of a new generation - Dylan, hands intertwined with musician Pete Seeger, the Freedom Singers and Odetta singing Blowin' in the Wind at the closing night of the Newport Folk Festival in 1963.

3

Bob Dylan: No Direction Home - Part 2

Martin Scorsese continues to explore the emotional, musicial and intellectual journey of Bob Dylan's early career. The story turns dark. At 23, Dylan is already a newsworthy phenomenon and with that success comes expectations - from the old left to become a politicial activist, and from the media to articulate the concerns of America's youth. It's a role in which Dylan is completely uninterested. He is already on the move, finding a new musical vocabulary to capture the complexity of a seismic cultural shift. He injects a heightened sense of poetry into his writing and adds electricity to his music, electricity that now seems inevitable but at the time saw him labelled a sell-out and a traitor. Scorsese delicately balances Dylan's internal world with signpost images from the external world. Dylan's music is the backdrop as the war in Vietnam escalates and the nightly news brings home images people would never have dreamed of seeing on their television sets. Scorsese takes the time to let viewers really see the music unfold in revelatory concert performances. By 1966 Dylan's personal world has become one of constant touring and press conferences. By the end of the film it is plainly obvious that for Dylan there are some journeys from which there is No Direction Home.

4

George Harrison: Living in the Material World - Part 1

Arena broadcasts the UK television premiere of Martin Scorsese's portrait of the late George Harrison. Scorsese traces Harrison's life from his beginnings in Liverpool to becoming a world-famous musician, philanthropist and filmmaker, weaving together interviews with George and his closest friends, photographs and archive footage including live performances - much of it previously unseen. The result is a rare glimpse into the mind of one of the most talented artists of his generation. Part one looks at George's early years in The Beatles - from their first gigs in Hamburg and the beginning of Beatlemania, through to his psychedelic phase and involvement in religion and Indian music. The programme includes contributions from Sir Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono, Eric Clapton, Sir George Martin and Phil Spector.

5

George Harrison: Living in the Material World - Part 2

Arena broadcasts the second and concluding part of Martin Scorsese's portrait of George Harrison. Part two looks at Harrison's post-Beatles days - as a member of the Travelling Wilburys and a solo artist, as well as looking at his non-musical ventures, including his work as a movie producer and his family life with wife Olivia and son Dhani. Racing legend Jackie Stewart tells of George's love of motor racing, Monty Python's Eric Idle recounts how George saved the Life of Brian from catastrophe by re-mortgaging his mansion to help finance it, and there are contributions from Travelling Wilbury bandmates including Tom Petty. Harrison's widow Olivia Harrison gives a poignant account of her life with the Beatle, including the harrowing tale of the night when a violent intruder attacked them at home one evening in 1999. Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton, Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono, Olivia and Dhani Harrison, among many others, talk openly about George's many gifts and contradictions and reveal the lives they shared together.

6

James Ellroy's Feast of Death

A programme exploring the work of crime writer James Ellroy, whose credits include LA Confidential, The Black Dahlia and My Dark Places, the latter a harrowing memoir of his own mother's murder. Ellroy later moved on from crime writing to pen his own secret history of the United States. As the second volume of his 'Underworld USA' trilogy - The Cold Six Thousand - was published in the UK in 2001, the film takes a tour of Ellroy's often disturbing world.
Episode Description

1

Dickens on Film

From the magical films of the silent era to the celebrated work of director David Lean and high definition television, this documentary revisits films and interviews from the archive to answer the question of why Dickens's novels have inspired so many hundreds of adaptations on screen. This co-production with Dickens 2012 not only encapsulates the history of Dickens's time, but also of the 100 years in which his work has survived most acutely on screen. It is not only the stories, themes and characters of Dickens's writing that translate so well onto screen - Sergei Eisenstein argued that there is something essentially filmic in his unique prose style; that Dickens's rapid 'cutting' within scenes and from scene to scene coupled with his seamless mixture of the bizarrely comic with the terrifyingly profound was itself proto-cinematic. Dickens wrote the way a camera saw before film had been invented and he remains to this day the most cinematic of writers.

2

Sonny Rollins: Beyond the Notes

2011 was the 82nd year in the extraordinary life of arguably the greatest saxophone player in the world, Sonny Rollins. Four decades ago, as a young filmmaker and aspiring musician, Dick Fontaine followed Rollins up onto the Williamsburg Bridge in Manhattan during one of his legendary escapes from the perils of 'the jazz life'. Today, still resisting stereotype and compromise, and revered by a new generation of young musicians, Rollins continues his single-minded search for meaning in his music and his life. Dick Fontaine's film is built around the explosive energy of Sonny's 80th Birthday Concert, where legendary figures Roy Haynes, Jim Hall and Ornette Coleman join him to celebrate his journey so far, his music and its future for a new generation.

3

Sonny Rollins '74: Rescued!

Featuring a specially-shot introduction with Jamie Cullum, Arena presents a lost treasure - Sonny Rollins performing at Ronnie Scott's in 1974. After nearly 40 years unseen, this unique film shows a spellbinding performance from arguably the greatest saxophone player in the world. Having played alongside Miles Davis, Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk, Rollins is one of the few surviving jazz greats. This gig captures him after his 1972 comeback when his bands started to sound funkier and to use electric guitar and bass. The band for this1974 set features Japanese guitarist Yoshiaki Masuo and soprano saxophone player Rufus Harley, who doubles on the bagpipes.

4

The Dreams of William Golding

The Dreams of William Golding reveals the extraordinary life of one of the greatest English writers of the 20th century. With unprecedented access to the unpublished diaries in which Golding recorded his dreams, the film penetrates deep into his private obsessions and insecurities. His daughter Judy and son David both speak frankly about their father's demons, and the film follows Golding from the impoverished schoolmaster whose first novel, Lord of the Flies, was published when he was forty-three years old, to his winning the Nobel Prize for literature in 1983. Other contributors include Golding's biographer John Carey, philosopher John Gray, writer Nigel Williams, the dean of Salisbury Cathedral, the Very Revd June Osborne and best-selling author Stephen King. Benedict Cumberbatch, who starred in the 2004 BBC adaptation of Golding's sea trilogy To the Ends of the Earth, reads extracts from his books.

5

Jonathan Miller

The BBC's flagship arts documentary strand Arena returns with the first ever documentary exploring the extraordinary life of Sir Jonathan Miller CBE. Jonathan Miller is usually described as a 'polymath' or 'Renaissance man', two labels he personally dislikes. But no-one quite like him has made such an impact on British culture through the medium of television, radio, theatre and opera. He has straddled the great divide between the arts and the sciences, while being a brilliant humorist, a qualified doctor and even a practising artist. With the man himself and a host of distinguished collaborators, including Oliver Sacks, Eric Idle, Kevin Spacey (who owes his first break to Miller) and Penelope Wilton, this Arena profile explores Miller's rich life and examines through amazing television archive - mostly from the BBC - how he makes these connections between the worlds of the imagination and scientific fact.

6

Amy Winehouse - The Day She Came to Dingle

Back in 2006 on a stormy December night, Amy Winehouse flew to the remote, south-western corner of Ireland to perform for Other Voices, an acclaimed Irish TV music series filmed in Dingle every winter. Amy took to the stage of Saint James's church, capacity 85, and wowed the small, packed crowd with a searing, acoustic set of songs from Back to Black. After leaving the stage, a relaxed and happy Amy spoke about her music and influences - Mahalia Jackson, Sarah Vaughan, Ray Charles and the Shangri-Las to name a few. Arena joined forces with Other Voices and went to Dingle to catch up with some of the people that Amy met on that day, including taxi driver Paddy Kennedy, her bass player Dale Davis and Rev Mairt Hanley of the Other Voices church. This film showcases not only Amy herself, but the musical geniuses that inspired her to forge her own jazz pop style.

7

The Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour - 1. Magical Mystery Tour Revisited

The making of the Beatles' self-directed TV movie Magical Mystery Tour, which originally aired on BBC1 on Boxing Day 1967 at the height of the band's popularity - but was greeted with disdain by the media and many viewers. The programme explores the creation of the surreal tale and investigates why it inspired such a furious critical reaction, and also asks whether opinions about the film have changed in subsequent years.

8

The Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour - 2. 'The Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour

Fully restored to the highest technical standard with a remixed soundtrack, Magical Mystery Tour comes out of the shadows and onto the screen. By the end of 1967, The Beatles had achieved a creativity unprecedented in popular music. Their triumphant summer release, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, was both avant garde and an instant hit. It went straight to No.1 in June and remained there for the rest of the year. They immersed themselves in the fiercely radical art of the new counter culture and decided to make a film on their own terms, not as pop stars but as artists. Roll up Roll Up for the Mystery Tour!

9

Sykes and a Day

Writer, performer and director, the late Eric Sykes was the renaissance man of British comedy. This episode of Arena opens the doors of the room that was his creative home for forty years."The minute I come through this door and I close it, then I'm in my world of creation. I can't tell you how many shows or how many films - it's all here, I can feel it, it's almost tangible", he says in the film. Post-war Britain saw Sykes catapulted to fame in the hugely successful Variety Bandbox and Educating Archie. He quickly became the country's highest paid comedy writer. When Spike Milligan was going through a period of stress, Sykes helped him with The Goons, sometimes writing whole episodes and typically eschewing the credit. Later, his television series with Hattie Jacques, Sykes And A... ran for 20 years attracting gigantic audiences. Aged 78, he starred in a UK tour of Charley's Aunt; appeared with Nicole Kidman in The Others; introduced The Teletubbies and returned to London's Theatreland, appearing eight times a week in Ray Cooney's hit, the uproarious farce Caught In The Net. The film takes him through a day at his beloved office, an Aladdin's Cave of triumphs and treasures. There he muses on his life and career, and the other greats he knew and worked with.

10

Screen Goddesses

Documentary focusing on the female stars of the Hollywood studio era, from its beginnings around 1910 through to its collapse in the early 1960s. Screen icons chronologically recalled include Theda Bara, Lillian Gish, Clara Bow, Louise Brooks, Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Rita Hayworth, Ava Gardner, Elizabeth Taylor and Marilyn Monroe.

11

Sister Wendy and the Art of the Gospel

The arresting sight of Sister Wendy Beckett - all teeth and glasses - burst on to our screens in the 1990’s. An instant star, she glided around the world in her habit telling us the story of painting. But she revealed nothing of her own, extraordinary story. Was she in fact a real nun? How did she know so much about art? And how could this consecrated virgin and hermit justify appearing on television and keep her rule of silence?
Episode Description

1

The Brian Epstein Story: The Sun Will Shine Tomorrow

First in a two-part documentary examining the turbulent life and career of Beatles manager Brian Epstein. Gay when homosexuality was illegal, a gambler, shopkeeper and failed actor, he was also pop king with a midas touch who, in the 60s, was as well known as the band he managed.

2

The Brian Epstein Story: Tomorrow Never Knows

Part two of the documentary on Beatles manager Brian Epstein. By the mid 60s, Epstein was lured into the world of gambling, sex and drugs and in 1967 he was found dead in his London mansion at the age of 32.

3

aka Norman Parkinson

To mark the centenary of his birth, Arena examines the glamorous life and exceptionally long career of pioneering photographer Norman Parkinson, an eccentric English gentleman who also produced his own brand of sausages. Featuring an abundance of beautiful images and with previously unseen footage, the film explores Parkinson's work with contributions from his models and collaborators, including Iman, Jerry Hall, Carmen Dell'Orefice, creative director of Vogue Grace Coddington and his grandson Jake Parkinson-Smith.

4

The National Theatre Part One: The Dream

First of two documentaries celebrating the National Theatre's 50th anniversary

5

The National Theatre Part Two: War and Peace

Looking at the new National Theatre from its opening in 1976 to the present day.
Episode Description

1

Whatever Happened to Spitting Image?

Reuniting the founding creative team, this documentary tells the vexed and frequently hilarious story of the genesis of the satirical puppet show Spitting Image, with exclusive contributions from caricaturists Peter Fluck and Roger Law and TV producer John Lloyd. Spanning the early years of Margaret Thatcher's government to the end of John Major's, Spitting Image puppets became almost as famous as the politicians they lampooned. In 2000, the puppets were auctioned off at Sotheby's and in the course of the programme the team sets out to discover where they now reside and who is taking care of them in their old age. Revealing the extraordinary technical achievement of the series, Arena meets the caricaturists, puppet-mould makers, designers, puppeteers, impressionists, writers and directors who worked tirelessly to ensure the show landed its weekly jibes and punches at the politicians, royals and celebrities of the day. Tracing its journey to our televisions screens through 12 years of huge audience figures and weekly controversy to its eventual demise, the film asks what Spitting Image got right, where it went wrong and whether its absence since 1996 has left a hole in the schedules that has yet to be filled by modern broadcasting.

2

The Brian Epstein Story: The Sun Will Shine Tomorrow

First in a two-part documentary examining the turbulent life and career of Beatles manager Brian Epstein. Gay when homosexuality was illegal, a gambler, shopkeeper and failed actor, he was also pop king with a Midas touch who, in the 60s, was as well known as the band he managed.

3

The Brian Epstein Story: Tomorrow Never Knows

Part two of the documentary on Beatles manager Brian Epstein. By the mid 60s, Epstein was lured into the world of gambling, sex and drugs and in 1967 he was found dead in his London mansion at the age of 32.

4

The 50 Year Argument - The New York Review of Books

The 50 Year Argument is Martin Scorsese's latest film, co-directed with his longtime documentary collaborator David Tedeschi. It charts literary, political and cultural history as per the New York Review of Books, America's leading journal of ideas since 1963. The film weaves rare archive material, interviews and writing by icons such as James Baldwin and Gore Vidal into original verite footage, filmed in the Review's Greenwich Village offices with longtime editor Robert Silvers.

5

The National Theatre - Learning Zone

Made specially for schools, this version of the BBC Four Arena programme examines the history and purpose of the National Theatre as it celebrates its 50th anniversary. A compilation of short films explores not only how the National Theatre came about, but also looks at its relevance today. Short films on Othello and Hamlet, using both rehearsal and performance footage, consider how the National Theatre takes a contemporary approach to Shakespeare's work. The importance of attracting new audiences is explored in a short film about Frankenstein. Using rehearsal and performance footage from their version of Frankenstein, the film also considers how they take a classic text to create theatrical events aimed at attracting young audiences. There is also a film about the staging of This House, a political, historically accurate play that turns a mirror on contemporary politics. James Graham explains how he researched and wrote the play.
Episode Description

1

Nicolas Roeg - It's About Time

The first major profile of the great British film director Nicolas Roeg, examining his very personal vision of cinema as in such films as Don't Look Now, Performance, Walkabout and The Man Who Fell to Earth. Roeg reflects on his career, which began as a leading cinematographer, and on the themes that have obsessed him, such as our perception of time and the difficulty of human relationships. With contributions from key collaborators, including Julie Christie, Jenny Agutter and Theresa Russell, and directors he has inspired such as Danny Boyle, Mike Figgis, Bernard Rose and Ben Wheatley.

2

Night and Day

In 2015, Arena celebrates its 40th anniversary, which makes it the longest-running arts documentary strand in the world. To mark the occasion, it presents Night and Day, a new film made entirely from Arena's own unique archive. For four decades, Arena has addressed the arts and culture of the world, high and low - from TS Eliot to Amy Winehouse. The Arena archive is a treasure trove that provides a history of the last hundred years. Featuring the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Jack Nicholson and a host of other stars, Night and Day evokes the one experience common to everything on the planet - the 24-hour cycle from dawn to dusk to dawn again. Bringing the past into the present - 24 hours in 90 minutes in 40 years of Arena.
Episode Description

1

Loretta Lynn: Still a Mountain Girl

Legendary country music singer-songwriter Loretta Lynn is loved by fans from across the world. She has sold over 45 million albums worldwide and won more awards than any other female country music star. With affectionate and irreverent contributions from her extended family of self-confessed rednecks, now in her early eighties and still going strong, Loretta looks back at her long and extraordinary life, from being born a coal miner's daughter in Kentucky to receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Barack Obama in 2013. Featuring Willie Nelson, Sheryl Crow, Jack White, Sissy Spacek and, of course, Loretta herself.

2

All the World's a Screen: Shakespeare on Film

From the silent days of cinema, Shakespeare's plays have often been adapted to the big screen. Film-makers relished his vivid characters and dramatic plots as well as the magic and poetry of his work. At first the results were patchy, then came Laurence Olivier. With Henry V, made to stir patriotic spirit during the Second World War, he perfectly translated Shakespeare from the stage to the screen. He followed Henry V with Hamlet, and both were smash hits. Olivier led the way for directors as diverse as Orson Welles, Kurosawa, Franco Zeffirelli, Roman Polanski, Baz Luhrmann and Kenneth Branagh. The Bard's language has been no barrier, with bold versions of his dramas coming out of Russia, Japan, India and many other countries, not to mention Hollywood's free adaptations in genres as diverse as musicals and science fiction. Already over 30 films worldwide have been produced based on Romeo and Juliet alone. For the first time in a single documentary, Arena explores the rich, global history of Shakespeare in the cinema, with a treasure trove of film extracts and archival interviews with their creators.

2

All the World's a Screen: Shakespeare on Film

From the silent days of cinema, Shakespeare's plays have often been adapted to the big screen. Film-makers relished his vivid characters and dramatic plots as well as the magic and poetry of his work. At first the results were patchy, then came Laurence Olivier. With Henry V, made to stir patriotic spirit during the Second World War, he perfectly translated Shakespeare from the stage to the screen. He followed Henry V with Hamlet, and both were smash hits. Olivier led the way for directors as diverse as Orson Welles, Kurosawa, Franco Zeffirelli, Roman Polanski, Baz Luhrmann and Kenneth Branagh. The Bard's language has been no barrier, with bold versions of his dramas coming out of Russia, Japan, India and many other countries, not to mention Hollywood's free adaptations in genres as diverse as musicals and science fiction. Already over 30 films worldwide have been produced based on Romeo and Juliet alone. For the first time in a single documentary, Arena explores the rich, global history of Shakespeare in the cinema, with a treasure trove of film extracts and archival interviews with their creators.

2

All the World's a Screen: Shakespeare on Film

From the silent days of cinema, Shakespeare's plays have often been adapted to the big screen. Film-makers relished his vivid characters and dramatic plots as well as the magic and poetry of his work. At first the results were patchy, then came Laurence Olivier. With Henry V, made to stir patriotic spirit during the Second World War, he perfectly translated Shakespeare from the stage to the screen. He followed Henry V with Hamlet, and both were smash hits. Olivier led the way for directors as diverse as Orson Welles, Kurosawa, Franco Zeffirelli, Roman Polanski, Baz Luhrmann and Kenneth Branagh. The Bard's language has been no barrier, with bold versions of his dramas coming out of Russia, Japan, India and many other countries, not to mention Hollywood's free adaptations in genres as diverse as musicals and science fiction. Already over 30 films worldwide have been produced based on Romeo and Juliet alone. For the first time in a single documentary, Arena explores the rich, global history of Shakespeare in the cinema, with a treasure trove of film extracts and archival interviews with their creators.

2

All the World's a Screen: Shakespeare on Film

From the silent days of cinema, Shakespeare's plays have often been adapted to the big screen. Film-makers relished his vivid characters and dramatic plots as well as the magic and poetry of his work. At first the results were patchy, then came Laurence Olivier. With Henry V, made to stir patriotic spirit during the Second World War, he perfectly translated Shakespeare from the stage to the screen. He followed Henry V with Hamlet, and both were smash hits. Olivier led the way for directors as diverse as Orson Welles, Kurosawa, Franco Zeffirelli, Roman Polanski, Baz Luhrmann and Kenneth Branagh. The Bard's language has been no barrier, with bold versions of his dramas coming out of Russia, Japan, India and many other countries, not to mention Hollywood's free adaptations in genres as diverse as musicals and science fiction. Already over 30 films worldwide have been produced based on Romeo and Juliet alone. For the first time in a single documentary, Arena explores the rich, global history of Shakespeare in the cinema, with a treasure trove of film extracts and archival interviews with their creators.

3

1966 - 50 Years Ago Today

Based on Jon Savage's book 1966: The Year the Decade Exploded, Arena marks the year pop music and popular culture ripped up the rule book in articulate, instinctive and radical new ways. This was the year of Jonathan Miller's Alice in Wonderland, Morgan - A Suitable Case for Treatment, and the year that Strawberry Fields Forever was recorded. Television was still in black and white, but the world outside was bursting with colour and controversy. In America, in London, in Amsterdam, in Paris, revolutionary ideas slow-cooking since the late 1950s reached boiling point. In popular culture and the mass media, 1966 was a year of restless experimentation and the search for new forms of expression - particularly in pop music. Written by Savage and director Paul Tickell, Arena's film takes viewers back to that moment in a vivid celebration of the music, films and TV that shaped the 1960s.

4

The Roundhouse - The People's Palace

Documentary telling the tragicomic rollercoaster story of a unique venue. On October 15th 1966, the Roundhouse in north London hosted its first gig - the launch of radical newspaper International Times. The audience included Paul McCartney and Marianne Faithfull, along with 3,000 others trying desperately to get in. The result was a glorious shambles. Since then, virtually every big name in rock and alternative theatre has played there. Today it's as vibrant as ever, continuing to attract big names and full houses and running an array of outreach and youth programmes enabling young people to express themselves in the arts.
Episode Description

1

Alone with Chrissie Hynde

Arena spends the summer with super cool self-confessed rock chick, Chrissie Hynde - shopping for clothes in Paris, hanging out with Sandra Bernhard in New York, life in London and a special trip back to her home town of Akron, Ohio. / / A thoughtful and intimate portrait of a 'lone, hungry, irritable wolf', featuring a glorious live performance at one of London's newest venues.

2

American Epic Part 1: The Big Bang

The first episode takes us back to 1920s America, where the growth of radio had shattered record sales. Record companies travelled rural America and recorded the music of ordinary people for the first time. The poor and oppressed were given a voice as their recordings spread from state to state. The film introduces the early recordings of The Carter Family, the founders of modern country music, steeped in the traditions of their isolated Appalachian community. It also features Will Shade and the Memphis Jug Band, whose music told the story of street life in Memphis, and laid the foundations for modern day rap and R'n'B. Robert Redford narrates this meticulously researched story of a cultural revolution that changed the world. "This isn't just another film, this is history" - Elton John.

3

American Epic Part 2: Blood and Soil

This episode takes a look at the stories of those early music pioneers whose names have largely been forgotten. In the small South Carolina town of Cheraw, Elder Burch held lively church gatherings which inspired young musicians - including jazz giant Dizzy Gillespie. Gillespie's autobiography cites Burch and his sons as direct inspirations; it is no exaggeration to say that modern music would not look the same without Burch's early influence. The programme takes a look at the gritty songs and musicians that came from the coal mines of Logan County, West Virginia - The Williamson Brothers, Dick Justice and Frank Hutchinson. The hellish conditions of the coal mines inspired them to find a way out, through their music. Finally we head to the home of the blues - the Mississippi Delta, where Charley Patton captured the sounds and struggles of life in the cotton fields. Patton's significance cannot be understated; he is widely considered the most influential musician in the birth of blues, teaching some of the best blues artists that followed including Howlin' Wolf, Robert Johnson and Honeyboy Edwards.

4

American Epic Part 3: Out of the Many, the One

The third episode takes a look at the influence of Hawaiian music and more specifically, the steel guitar, which became a central sound to a range of musical styles. When Joseph Kekuku picked up a metal bolt as he wandered down a train track, the bolt hit the strings of his guitar and the sound was born. He perfected his slide to create a new instrument that would travel the world. The programme continues with an exploration of Cajun music, the blended music of Louisiana that reflects the winding landscape of the bayous. This appealed to the record companies as something set apart from the established genres of country, jazz and blues. Central to the scene were the Breaux family, who talk about continuing their musical heritage today. Finally we hear the story of Mississippi John Hurt - discovered in the 1920s but soon forgotten, he represents the odyssey of American Epic in microcosm. After travelling to Memphis where his music was recorded, he returned home to Avalon, a tiny spot on the map of Mississippi. With the Depression, recording in the south came virtually to a halt and Hurt simply went back to sharecropping, his music forgotten by all but a few dedicated collectors. 35 years after those first recordings, folklorist Dick Spottswood tracked down Hurt in 1963, sparking a revival of his music. He starred at the Newport Folk Festival and became celebrated all over the world.

5

American Epic: The Sessions

The machine that introduced the sounds of America to its people has been lovingly reassembled and now, in the heart of Hollywood, in a perfect recreation of the atmosphere and conditions of America's first ever recording studios, today's music superstars roll the epic on. Elton John, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Alabama Shakes, Jack White, Nas, Ana Gabriel, Beck, Los Lobos and Steve Martin are among the artists who test their skills against the demands of the recording machine that literally made American music. There are no edits, no overdubs and no retakes, and the disc only allows for three minutes of recording time. Despite these limitations, today's recordings for American Epic have one advantage - the freshly recorded sound is crystal clear and of an astonishing depth, transporting us vividly into the past - and the future.

6

Kirsty Young: 75 Years of Desert Island Discs

As Desert Island Discs reaches 75, today's custodian of the island, Kirsty Young, introduces the 1982 Bafta-winning Arena classic. It celebrated Roy Plomley and his magical idea on their 40th anniversary. By then, everyone who was anyone had been cast adrift and washed up on Roy's island. Arena's castaways include 40th anniversary guest Paul McCartney, Frankie Howerd, Trevor Brooking, Professor J K Galbraith, Russell Harty and the great comedian Arthur Askey.